A Treatise on Headache and Neuralgia: Including Spinal Irritation and a Disquisition on Normal and Morbid Sleep

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E.B. Treat, 1888 - Eyestrain - 259 pages
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Page 266 - ITS HYGIENE, CAUSES, SYMPTOMS AND TREATMENT, WITH A CHAPTER ON DIET FOR THE NERVOUS. By GEORGE M. BEARD, AM, MD, formerly Lecturer on Nervous Diseases in the University of the City of New York ; Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine ; Author of "Our Home Physician," "Hay Fever;" one of the Authors of " Medical and Surgical Electricity,
Page 267 - INSANITY. Its Classification, Diagnosis and Treatment ; a Manual for Students and Practitioners of Medicine.
Page 261 - WILLIAM AITKEN, MD, Edin., FRS, PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY IN THE ARMY MEDICAL SCHOOL ; EXAMINER IN MEDICINE FOR THE MILITARY MEDICAL SERVICES OF THE QUEEN ; FELLOW OF THE SANITARY INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN ; CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE ROYAL IMPERIAL SOCIETY OF PHYSICIANS OF VIENNA ; AND OF THE SOCIETY OF MEDICINE AND NATURAL HISTORY OF DRESDEN.
Page 174 - Temple, and professed that he was as well as he had ever been in his life, and thanked me for the care I had taken of him.
Page 266 - ... could they become neurasthenic. They do not belong to the type out of which neurasthenia is born, either mentally or physically. Many of them are unintellectual, phlegmatic, and intolerably indolent, and are pleased at a diagnosis which touches the nerves rather than the stomach, bowels and liver. Instead of rest, quiet and soothing draughts. they need mental and physical activity, less rather than more food, depletion rather than repletion.
Page 221 - Her sleep was remarkably profound, and had all the characters of complete insensibility, with the exception of a feeble respiration, and a weak but regular movement of the pulse. The most singular fact connected with her remains to be mentioned. When the disorder had lasted six months, and then ceased, she had an interval of perfect health for the same length of time. When it lasted one year, the subsequent interval was of equal duration. The affection at last wore gradually away ; and she lived,...
Page 17 - These, then, are the nerves which are of chief interest to our present inquiry. Nerves of this class accompany blood-vessels, and when we observe the large amount of these vessels, the brain and its me'mbranes being more liberally supplied with blood than any other organ (the quantity being computed as one-fifth of the blood of the whole body), we might, without searching further, feel convinced that there must be a corresponding supply of ganglionic nerves; but the minute examination of modern anatomists...
Page 268 - This volume contains in addition to the results of the author's experience obtained in hospital and private practice, the substance of a course of lectures delivered in the Medical Department of the University of New York...
Page 265 - By Robert Saundby. MD, Edin.; Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, London; Emeritus Senior President of the Royal Medical Society; Fellow of the Royal...
Page 177 - CWE, about 50 years of age, naturally a stout, very healthy man, weighing nearly seventeen stone, a widower, of very active habits, mentally and bodily, was in a railway collision on February 3d, 1865. He was violently shaken to and fro, but received no bruise or any sign whatever of external injury. He was necessarily much alarmed at the time, but was able to proceed on his journey to London, a distance of seventy or eighty miles. On his arrival in town he felt shaken and confused, but went about...

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