A Treatise on Politics

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Holyoake, 1854 - Political science - 115 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
12
III
15
IV
25
V
33
VI
37
VII
40
VIII
52
IX
71
X
98
XI
106
XII
113
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Page 17 - more than enough that it is no more in our power to have a sound mind than a sound body. Since moreover everything, as far as it is able, strives to conserve its Being, we cannot doubt that if it were equally in our power to live according to the prescripts of reason, as to be led by blind desire, all would seek the guidance of reason and
Page 12 - generally written a satire, while they have never conceived a political system which could be adapted to use, but such a one only as passed for a chimera, or might have been established in Utopia or in that golden age of the poets where least of all it was needed.
Page 16 - determined by the power of reason alone. But men are more led by blind desire than by reason, and therefore the natural power or right of
Page 115 - where both sexes ruled equally, and others where the men were ruled by the women, and so educated as to be inferior to them in talent; but as
Page 41 - so long without any notable change as that of the Turks, and on the other hand
Page 19 - of nature under which all men are born and for the most part live,
Page 16 - the power of natural things by which they exist, and consequently by which they operate, can be none other than the eternal power of God
Page 1 - heroic names there are few nobler than Spinoza's. Apart altogether from the estimate we may form of his philosophy, there is something unspeakably interesting in the life and the character of the man. The prevailing attitude of his being was a kind of genial stoicism, in
Page 19 - but by infinite other laws, which have regard to the eternal order of universal nature, of which man is only a
Page 18 - the Devil himself? Who, I ask, rendered this, the most excellent of intelligent creatures, so mad, that he wished to be greater than God ? Could he render himself thus

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