A Treatise on Rivers and Canals: Text

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Clarendon Press, 1882 - Canals
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Page 1 - ... one of the most important, and at the same time, one of the least expensive and troublesome, which we possess.
Page iii - MA). A Treatise on Rivers and Canals, relating to the Control and Improvement of Rivers, and the Design, Construction, and Development of Canals.
Page 109 - ... poisoned by equal quantities of hydrocyanic acid, the fatal period varied from fifteen to forty-five minutes. Dr. Fagge relates the case of a medical student who took about a drachm and a half of Scheele's acid, and was thereby immediately rendered insensible; but he did not die from its effects until from one hour and a quarter to one hour and a half after it had been taken.
Page 81 - Then this gate is shut, and the other gate is opened when the level of the water in the lock is the same as that of the water on the side where the boat wants to go.
Page 235 - The tidal flow should be admitted as far up a river as possible, and all barriers to its progress removed, so that the period of slack water may be reduced to a minimum.
Page 37 - ... long enough to span the opening. When the stanch was used, the boatmen turned the beam across the opening, and placed vertically in the stream, a number of narrow planks, resting against the bottom cill, and the swinging beam, thus forming a weir, which raised the water in the stream about 5 feet high ; the boards were then rapidly withdrawn, the swinging beam was turned back, and all the boats which had been collected above, were carried by the flash over the shallows below. By repeating this...
Page 72 - ... of the pile, but, at the same time, not from so great a height as to generate a force which would expend itself in crushing the fibres of the head of the pile. In such a case, it will be found that the pile will safely bear, without danger of further subsidence, " as many times the weight of the ram, as the distance which the pile is sunk the last blow, is contained in the distance which the ram falls in making that blow, divided by eight.
Page 36 - Two substantial posts, with a bottom cross rill, were fixed at a given distance apart, sufficient to permit a boat to pass easily between them. Upon one of these posts was a beam turning on its centre, and long enough to span the opening. When the stanch was used, the boatmen turned the beam across the opening, and placed vertically in the stream, a number of narrow planks, resting against the bottom cill, and the swinging beam, thus forming a weir, which raised the water in the stream about 5 feet...
Page 163 - Notes on some of the chief navigable Rivers and Canals in the United States and Canada.
Page 1 - are not always suitable for navigation, in their natural condition, even in the lower portions of their course ; and, owing to the continual changes taking place in their channels and at their outlets, they are liable to deteriorate if left to themselves.

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