A treatise on surveying: comprising the theory and the practice, Volume 1

Front Cover
D. Appleton and company, 1897 - Surveying
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Contents

Special instruments
47
lManimeters
48
SO Trigonoinetrically
49
ChainSurveying
50
By sketch
53
In columns
54
8586 Fieldbooks
56
Surveying by tieline
57
Chainangles
58
Surveying by diagonals
59
Surveyors cross
60
Optical square
61
Diagonals and perpendiculars
62
Offsets 05
68
99100 Calculating content
69
Equalizing TO 102 Combination of methods
71
Fieldbooks
72
Inaccessible areas
76
Obstacles to measurement TO 106120 Problems on perpendiculars
77
121125 Problems on parallels
81
128129 Ranging with rods
82
By perpendiculars
85
By symmetrical triangles SO 133 By transversals
86
By harmonic conIugates
87
Across a valley
89
Over a hill S9 141 On water
90
Through a wood
91
By perpendiculars
92
By symmetrical triangles
93
By parallels
94
154155 By symmetrical triangles
95
By harmonic division
96
To an inaccessible intersection
97
By a parallelogram
98
CompassSurveying
100
The needle
101
The sights
102
The divided circle
103
The points
104
Levels
106
Verniers
107
Tripods 1OT 177 Jacobs staff
108
The prismatic compass
109
ABTICLE PAGE 186 Local attraction
117
Angles of deflection
118
To change bearings
120
Linesurveying
121
Checks by intersecting bearings 12
122
Canalmaps
124
Fieldnotes
125
Tests of accuracy
126
Method of intersection
127
Platting bearings
128
With a protractor
129
To close a plat
130
Fieldplatting
131
With a protractor
132
Drawingboard protractor
133
With a scale of chords
134
With a table of chords 184
135
Strctohing the paper
136
By tracingpaper
137
By transferpaper
138
By squares
139
By pantograph
140
Orientation Ill 235 Lettering
141
Definitions
142
Calculation of latitudes and de partures
143
Methods
152
Definitions
153
Areas
154
A threesided field
155
General rule
156
Setting out a meridian
172
To correct magnetic bearings
174
To survey aline with true bearings
176
Diurnal variation
177
Secular variation
178
Defects of the compass
179
2S0 Determination of chango by old lines
180
To run old lines
181
Remedy forevilsofsecularchange
184
TransitSurveying
185
Instrumental parallax
192
The diagonal eyepieee
198
Illustration
204
Circle divided to 15
210
To measure an angle
222
Farmsurveying
228
On sloping ground
235
Obstacles to Surveying
242
General method 246 I
245
By triangulation 250 I
250
When one point can not be seen from the other
251
382388 Problems
252
General statement
258
When they are not adjacent
259
When the lengths of two adjacont sides are wanting
260
When they are not adjacent
261
When the bearing of two adjacent sides are wanting
262
Laying out and dividing up Land
263
To lay out rectangles
264
To lay out circles
265
Land sold for taxes
266
Its object
267
408409 To part off a trapezoid
268
To part off a trianglo
269
To part off a quadrilatoral
270
To part off a triangle
271
To part off any figure
272
To part off a quadrilateral
273
To part off a trianglo
275
N0 0FF AND DiViDiN0 UP LaND 421 To part off a quadrilateral
278
To part off a triangle
280
Methods
281
Straightening crooked fenceB
282
By lines parallel to a side
284
By lines starting from an angle
285
By lines passing through a given point within the triangle
287
434436 Graphical solutions
289
By the shortest line
290
By lines parallel to a side
291
By lines starting from points in a side
293
By lines parallel to a side
294
By lines perpondicular to a side
296
Surveying United States Public Lands
300
General statement
332
Resurveys
343
Introduction 343 1493 Legal rules for resurveys 845
344
Direct Leveling
352
Field routine
380
Appendix A Synopsis of Plane Trigonometry
401
Appendix B Transversals Harmonic Division etc
410
Theory of transversals 410 The complete quadrilateral
412
Problems in Fieldwork
416
Chainsurveying 41H Leveling
419
A decalogue of donts for beginners in using surveying instruments
442
Analytical Table of Contents
443
APPENDIX
450
Table of chords
458
Logarithmic Sines Cosines Tangents
1
Taking bearings 112
112
Marking of compasspoints 113
113
Reading the vernier 114
114
To magnetize a needle 116
116
Copyright

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Page 345 - An act providing for the sale of the lands of the United States in the territory northwest of the river Ohio, and above the mouth of the Kentucky river...
Page 401 - Every circumference is regarded as being divided into 360 equal parts, called degrees. Each degree is divided into 60 equal parts, called minutes, and each minute into 60 seconds. These divisions are indicated by the marks ' ". Thus 28 degrees, 17 minutes, and 49 seconds, are written 28 17' 49" Fractions of a second are best expressed decimally.
Page 311 - bearing trees," with the course and distance of the same from their respective corners; and the precise relative position of witness corners to the true corners. 3. The kind of materials of which corners are constructed.
Page 401 - Every circumference of a. circle, whether the circle be large or small, is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts called degrees. Each degree is divided into 60 equal parts called minutes, and each minute into 60 equal parts called seconds.
Page 301 - And in all cases where the exterior lines of the townships, thus to be subdivided into sections or half sections, shall exceed or shall not extend six miles, the excess or deficiency shall be specially noted, and added to or deducted from the western and northern ranges of sections or half sections in such township, according as the error may be in. running the lines from east to west, or from south to north.
Page 313 - A sufficient number of other trees standing nearest to your line, on either side of it, are to be blazed on two sides, diagonally or quartering towards the line, in order to render the line conspicuous, and readily to be traced, the blazes to be opposite each other, coinciding in direction with the line where the trees stand very near it, and to approach nearer each other, the further the line passes from the blazed trees. Due care must ever be taken to have the lines so well marked as to be readily...
Page 132 - ELEMENTS OF GEOLOGY. A Text-book for Colleges and for the General Reader. By JOSEPH LE CONTE, LL.
Page 314 - ... is to be marked the appropriate number of the particular one of the four sections, respectively, which such side faces; also on one side thereof are to be marked the numbers of its township and range; and to make such marks yet more conspicuous, (in manner aforesaid), a streak of red chalk is to be applied. In...
Page 402 - The versed-sine of an arc, AM, is the distance, AP, comprised between the origin of the arc and the foot of the sine. It is consequently equal to the difference between the radius and the sine. The Trigonometrical lines are usually written in an abbreviated form. Calling the arc AM =sa, we write, MP = sin.
Page 317 - Besides the ordinary notes taken on line, (and which must always be written down on the spot, leaving nothing to be supplied by memory,) the deputy will subjoin, at the conclusion of his book, such further description or information touching any matter or thing connected with the township, (or other survey,) which he may be able to afford, and may deem useful or necessary to be known — with a general description of the township in the aggregate, as respects the face of the country, its soil and...

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