A treatise on surveying: comprising the theory and the practice..., Part 2

Front Cover
D. Appleton and Company, 1897 - Surveying
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Iced bar apparatus
73
Cutoff cylinder
76
Method of measurement
77
Computation formulas
78
Standardization of B
79
Duplex base apparatus
81
Accuracy obtainable in base meas urements
84
Degree of accuracy necessary
85
Reducing the base to the level of the sea
86
To interpolate a base
87
Eccentric reduction
89
Reduction of horizontal direction to sea level
90
Final adjustment
91
Local or station adjustments
92
Number of local equations at a station
93
Local adjustment for directions
96
General or figure adjustment
101
Number of angle equations in a net
103
Side equations
105
Reduction to linear form
106
Number of side equations in a net
107
Adjustment of the discrepancy in bases
110
Computation of geodetic positions
114
Difference in longitude
120
Reverse or back azimuth
121
The shape of the earth
124
Lines on a spheroid
125
Astronomical and geodetic azi muths
126
Determination of the figure of the earth
127
Mapmaking
130
Definitions
133
Declination and hour angle in terms of altitude and azimuth
140
Hour angle azimuth and zenith distance of a star at elongation
141
Precession
142
The aberration of the fixed stars
143
The beginning of the year
144
Parallax
145
The dip of the horizon
146
Sidereal and solar days
147
Relation of apparent and mean time
148
The transit
156
The meridian telescope 15S 636 Diaphragms
158
To make the lines vertical
161
Record
165
Pivot inequality
166
Value of level division ICS 694 Determination of equatorial inter val of lines
168
Computation of chronometer cor rection
170
Collimation correction
171
Azimuth correction
172
Definitions
176
By transporting chronometers
177
By exchange of terrestrial signals
179
By celestial signals
180
The chronograph
181
i0o Personal equation
183
7u6 Adjustment of discrepancies
184
First methodBy meridian alti tudes or zenith distances
185
Third methodBy single alti tude at a given time
186
Fourth methodTo reduce an al titude observed at a given timo to the meridian
188
Fifth methodBy reduction of circummeridian altitude
189
Sixth methodBy tho polo star
191
The instrument 192
192
ARTICLE PAOK 715 Adjustment of the zenith tele scope
194
Precision
195
Directions for observing
196
Determination of the value of one division of tho micrometer
197
Computation general expression for latitude
200
Correction for refraction 801
201
7S7 Formulas for computation
233
Leveling by tho sea horizon
235
Definition
242
Instruments
243
Rods
245
Adjustments 24S 745 Instrumental constants
249
Standardization and adjustment of rods
252
74s Method of observation
254
74 Bench murks
257
Principles
259
Computation
260
Curvature and refraction
262
Temperature correction
264
Precision of a line of levels
267
Adjustment of levels
269
Mean sea level
271
The hypsometer
276
Applications
277
ARTICLE PA01I 766 Correction for temperature of the air
278
Guyots formula and tables 278 I
294
Approximations
295
Definition
297
Field work
298
Cross sectioning
299
TheBtadia method 801
309
Reduction of stadia notes
311
Tables 815
315
Colbys slide rule
318
The WagnerFennel tacheometer
319
The plane table
321
Instruments 822
329
The clinometer
339
793 Photography
342
The representation of the config uration of the ground
343
Contours
344
Hill shading
350
The horizontal system
351
The vertical system with vertical illumination
352
Brush bill shading
359
Object
375
Principle 875
376
The box sextant 877
377
Adjustment of the sextant 37b 809 How to observe
379
To measure a line one end of which is inaccessible
380
To measure a line both ends of which arc inaccessible
382
To measure heights 3S2 815 To measure altitudes in an arti ficial horizon
383
To measure slopes with a sextant and artificial horizon
385
Trilincar surveying 887
389
Analytical solution
390
The highwater line
391
b23 Measuring a base on the water 892
392
Signals
394
From the boat with a compass 894
395
Systems of lines for soundings 895
396
Tide gauges
397
The thrco objects 401 839 Marking stations
402
First objectSurveying old lines 401 840 Transit points
403
Stations 402 841 Giving the sights
404
Keeping the notes
411
lluking the map
419
General plans
425
Instruments
432
Subsurface lines
439
Street railways
448
Measurement of angles
457
22
464
Barometric Leveling
466
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 469 - ELEMENTS OF GEOLOGY. A Text-book for Colleges and for the General Reader. By JOSEPH LE CONTE, LL. D.
Page 473 - The series will consist of twelve volumes, each being an essay descriptive of a great natural region, its marked physical features, and the life of the people.
Page 471 - BOOKS is to provide wholesome, instructive, and entertaining reading for young people during the early educative period, and more especially through such means to bring the home and the school into closer relations and into more thorough cooperation. They furnish a great variety of recreative reading for the home, stimulating a desire in the young pupil for further knowledge and research, and cultivating a taste for good literature that will be of permanent benefit to him.
Page 474 - THE FRENCH PEOPLE. By ARTHUR HASSALL, MA, Student of Christ Church, Oxford ; Author of " The Balance of Power," etc. In accordance with the general plan of the series, this important work presents the evolution of a people. The method is modern, and although the sources, development, and transitions of a great race are fully indicated in a comparatively small compass, the author's aims and results differ widely from the set record of political, dynastic, and military facts which are chronicled in...
Page 469 - CAUSE OF AN ICE AGE. By Sir ROBERT BALL, LL. D., FRS, Royal Astronomer of Ireland, author of "Starland.
Page 279 - Z = the difference of level between the two barometers ; L = the mean latitude between the two stations ; H= the height of the barometer at the upper station reduced to the temperature of the barometer at the lower station ; or, H= h...
Page 147 - The sidereal day is the interval between two successive transits of the vernal equinox over the same meridian. The sidereal time at any instant is the hour angle of the vernal equinox reckoned from the meridian towards the west from 0 to 24 hours.
Page 22 - ... elevations must be at least 278 feet above mean tide, or one 230 feet, and the other 331 feet, etc. This supposes that the intervening country is low, and that the ground at the tangent point is not above the mean surface of the sphere. If the height of the ground at this point should be 200 feet above mean tide, then the natural elevations should be 478, or 430, and 531 feet, etc., in height, and the line barely possible.
Page 472 - ... the varying phases of his country's history as it is woven on the warp of the administrations will find most useful. Everything is presented in a clear-cut way, and no pleasanter excursions into history can be found than a study of * The Presidents of the United States.
Page 469 - With upward of 900 Illustrations. New and enlarged edition. 8vo. Cloth, $4.00. " Besides preparing a comprehensive text-book, suited to present demands, Professor Le Conte has given us a volume of great value as an exposition of the subject, thoroughly up to date. The examples and applications of the work are almost entirely derived from this country, so that it may be properly considered an American geology. We can commend this work without qualification to all who desire an intelligent acquaintance...

Bibliographic information