A Treatise on Surveying: Comprising the Theory and the Practice, Volume 1

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1897 - Surveying
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Contents

Planimeters
48
Trigonometricalhj
49
Surveying by diagonals
50
By sketch
53
In columns
56
Surveying by tie lines
57
Chain angles
58
Survey ing by diagonals
59
Surveyors cross
60
Optical square
61
Diagonals and perpendiculars
62
Orlsets
65
9S Platting offsets
68
99100 Calculating content
69
Equalizing
70
Combination of methods
71
Field books
72
Inaccessible areas
76
Problems on perpendiculars
77
181125 Problems on parallels
81
128129 Ranging with rods
82
By perpendiculars
85
By symmetrical triangles
86
By harmonic conjugates
87
Across n vulley
89
On water
90
Through a wood
91
By perpendiculars
92
By symmetrical triangles S3 148 By transversals
93
By parallels
94
154155 By symmetrical triangles
95
By harmonic division
96
To an inaccessible intersection
97
By a parallelogram
98
Principle
100
The needle
101
The sights
102
The divided circle
103
The points
104
Taiiircnt scale
106
Verniers
107
Jacobs staff
108
The prismatic compass
109
Defects of the compass Itl 1S Taking bearings
112
Marking of compass points
113
Heading the vernier
114
To magnetise a needle
116
ARTICLE AOE 186 Local attraction
117
Angles of deflection
118
To change bearings
120
Line surveying
121
Checks by intersecting bearings
122
Canal maps
124
Field notes
126
Method of intersection
127
Platting bearings
128
With a protractor
129
To close a plat
130
Field platting 181
135
Stretching the paper
136
Copying by tracing 186
137
By transfer paper
138
By intersections 188
139
By pantagraph
140
Orientation
141
Definitions
142
Calculation of latitudes and de partures
144
Traverse table
145
Application to testing a survey
148
Application to supplying omis sions
149
Definitions
164
By the north star in the meridian
165
Times of crossing the meridian
167
By the north star at extreme elon gation
168
Observations
170
Setting out a meridian
172
To correct magnetic bearings
174
To survey a line with true bearings
176
Diurnal variation
177
Secular variation
178
Determination of change by inter polation
179
Determination of change by old lines
180
To run old lines
181
Remedy tor evils of secular change
184
Back sights
185
Instrumental parallax
192
The diagonal oye pieee
198
Retrograde verniers
204
Circle divided to 15
210
Third adjustment
218
Notation of angles
224
With the engineers chain
230
Formulas 288
239
General method
246
B When One End ofthe Line is inaccessible
250
General statement
257
Its nature
264
To part off u quudrilateral
270
To part off a triangle
280
By the shortest line
290
By lines perpendicular to a side
296
A great ei lc
334
Lengths of parallels 840
342
Introduction 352
352
The peg method of adjustment
372
Egaults level 873
374
Rods
375
Targets
376
Vernier 877
378
Field routine 880
389
Limits ot precision 860
390
Steep slopes
392
When the rod is too low
393
When the rod is too high
394
Underwood 895
395
A houBe 896
396
Reciprocal leveling
397
Its nature 897
398
To locate a level line 899
400
Definition
401
Trigonometrical lines
402
The lines as ratios
403
Their changes of sign
404
Their mutual relations
405
Two arcs
406
The tables
407
Oblique angled triangles
408
Theory of transversals 410 The complete quadrilateral
412
Chain surveying 41ii Leveling
419
A decalogue of donts lor beginners in using surveying instruments
442
TABLES
451
Table of chords
459
Loqarithms of numbers
1
Sixth method 5
5
Tallies 12
12
Distances by pacing 18
18
Perpendiculars 28
26
Scales of equal parts
80
Unit of content 86
86
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 345 - AN ACT providing for the sale of the lands of the United States in the Territory NORTHWEST of the Ohio, and above the mouth of the Kentucky river...
Page 401 - Every circumference of a. circle, whether the circle be large or small, is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts called degrees. Each degree is divided into 60 equal parts called minutes, and each minute into 60 equal parts called seconds.
Page 301 - And in all cases where the exterior lines of the townships, thus to be subdivided into sections or half sections, shall exceed or shall not extend six miles, the excess or deficiency shall be specially noted, and added to or deducted from the western and northern ranges of sections or half sections in such township, according as the error may be in. running the lines from east to west, or from south to north.
Page 401 - Every circumference is regarded as being divided into 360 equal parts, called degrees. Each degree is divided into 60 equal parts, called minutes^ and each minute into 60 seconds. These divisions are indicated by the marks ' ". Thus 28 degrees, 17 minutes, and 49 seconds, are written '28 17' 49'' Fractions of a second are best expressed decimally.
Page 402 - The versed-sine of an arc, AM, is the distance, AP, comprised between the origin of the arc and the foot of the sine. It is consequently equal to the difference between the radius and the sine. The Trigonometrical lines are usually written in an abbreviated form. Calling the arc AM =sa, we write, MP = sin.
Page i - The twenty-one essays which constitute the work present the whole subject of evolution with great fullness. A TREATISE ON SURVEYING, COMPRISING THE THEORY AND THE PRACTICE. By WILLIAM M. GILLESPIE, LL. D., formerly Professor of Civil Engineering in Union College. Revised and enlarged by CADY STALEY, Ph. D., President of Case School of Applied Science. With numerous Illustrations. 8vo, half bound. $3.50. The two volumes previously published, "Land Surveying" and "Leveling and Higher Surveying," are...
Page 311 - ... the foot of all remarkable hills and ridges, with their courses, and estimated height in feet, above the level land of the surrounding country, or above the bottom lands, ravines, or waters near which they are situated.
Page 317 - Besides the ordinary notes taken on line, (and which must always be written down on the spot, leaving nothing to be supplied by memory,) the deputy will subjoin, at the conclusion of his book, such further description or information touching any matter or thing connected with the township, (or other survey,) which he may be able to afford, and may deem useful or necessary to be known — with a general description of the township in the aggregate, as respects the face of the country, its soil and...
Page 345 - The public lands shall be divided by north and south lines run according to the true meridian, and by others crossing them at right angles, so as to form townships of six miles square...
Page 315 - At all township corners, and at all section corners, on range or township lines, four bearing trees are to be marked in this manner, one in each of the adjoining sections. At interior section corners four trees, one to stand within each of the four sections to which such corner is common, are to be marked in manner aforesaid, if such be found. From quarter section and meander corners two bearing trees are to be marked, one within each of the adjoining sections.

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