A Treatise on the Incubus, Or, Nightmare, Disturbed Sleep, Terrific Dreams, and Nocturnal Visions: With the Means of Removing These Distressing Complaints

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Cox, 1816 - Dreams - 115 pages
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Page 43 - I waited upon my patient in the morning, I was not a little surprised to find that he was asleep; and was utterly confounded on being told that he had been so all night ; and as this was the first sleep he had enjoyed for three or four days, the attendants were very minute in detailing the whole particulars of it.
Page 43 - I was not a little surprised to find that he was asleep ; and was utterly confounded on being told that he had been so all night ; and as this was the first sleep he had enjoyed for three or four days, the attendants were very minute in detailing the whole particulars of it. Although this account appeared inconsistent with what I conceived I had seen, and with what I concluded they knew as well as myself, I did not, for some time, perceive the error into which I had been led, till I observed that...
Page 34 - a gentleman, who is living at this moment a needless slave to terror, which arises from a circumstance which admits easily of explanation. He was lying in his bed with his wife, and, as he supposed, quite awake, when he felt distinctly the impression of some person's hand upon his right shoulder, which created such a degree of alarm that he dared not to move himself in bed, and indeed could not, if he had possessed the courage. It was some time before he had it in his power to awake his wife, and...
Page 42 - ... me by name, in the manner he was accustomed to do in his delirium ; and immediately after, I saw him standing by my bedside, holding the curtains open, expressing all that wildness in his looks which accompanies violent delirium. At the same moment, I heard the voices of his two attendants coming up the stairs in search of him, who likewise came into the room and took him away. During all this scene I was attempting to speak, but could not articulate ; I thought, however, that I succeeded in...
Page 41 - ... attendance given to him, I was, from that cause alone, rendered more than usually liable to the attacks of nightmare, which consequently intruded itself every night upon my slumbers. The young gentleman in question, from the violence of his delirium, was with great difficulty kept in bed; and had once or twice eluded the vigilance of his attendants, and jumped out of bed; an accident of which I was every moment dreading a repetition. I awoke from my sleep one morning about four o'clock, at least...
Page 28 - Night-mare, is so much greater than happens in a dream, that the person who has had a vision of this kind cannot...
Page 111 - Night-Mare ought never to sleep alone, but to have always some person near them and within reach, so as to be immediately awoke by their groans or struggles ; and the person to whom this office may be entrusted, should be instructed to rouse the patient as early as possible, that the paroxysm may not have time to gain strength ; for the frequent repetition of the paroxysms gives greater strength to the disease, and that in proportion to the length of their duration.
Page 43 - ... knew as well as myself, I did not, for some time, perceive the error into which I had been led, till I observed that some of my questions and remarks were not intelligible ; then I began to suspect the true source of the error, which I should never have discovered, had not experience rendered those hallucinations familiar to me. But the whole of this transaction had so much consistency and probability in it, that I might, under different circumstances, have remained for ever ignorant of having...
Page 22 - ... usually subsides very soon after waking, it is not rare for the attack to continue for some time in spite of clear consciousness. In the second quotation from Macnish given above there is a graphic description of this, and it may further be illustrated by the following sketch drawn by...
Page 110 - ... morning in the torpid state that so often supervenes after an over-long or overdeep sleep. Motet " and Pfaff " state that it generally occurs in the first half of the night; Waller™ says that it is almost always produced by sleeping too long, frequently by sleeping too soon, and that in his own case indulging in sleep too late in the morning is an almost certain method of bringing on an attack. I have noticed that the attack tends to recur at about the same time in the same subject, and w,ould...

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