A Treatise on the Language, Poetry, and Music of the Highland Clans

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D.R. Collie & son, 1862 - Music - 20 pages
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Page 60 - It is wonderful how in such precipitate rapidity of the fingers, the musical proportions are preserved, and, by their art, faultless throughout. In the midst of their complicated modulations and most intricate arrangement of notes, by a rapidity so sweet, a regularity so irregular, a concord so discordant, the Melody is rendered harmonious and perfect...
Page 30 - Christ is spread abroad, through several nations and tongues, at one and the same time; except only these and their accomplices in obstinacy, I mean the Picts and the Britons, who foolishly, in these two remote islands of the world, and only in part even of them, oppose all the rest of the universe.
Page 233 - Lord Viscount Dundee, their General, the terror of the Whigs, the supporter of King James, and the glory of his country. Then the Highlanders fired, threw down their fusils, rushed in upon the enemy with sword, target, and pistol, who did not maintain their ground two minutes after the Highlanders were amongst them ; and I dare be bold to say there scarce ever were such strokes given in Europe as were given that day by the Highlanders.
Page 233 - Then the Highlanders fired, threw down their fusils, rushed in upon the enemy, with sword, target, and pistol, who did not maintain their ground two minutes after the Highlanders were amongst them ; and I dare be bold to say, there were scarce ever such strokes given in Europe as were given that day by the Highlanders.
Page 60 - Hiberniae, lib. iii. cap. 2, p. 739. the cultivation of instrumental music alone that I consider the proficiency of this people to be worthy of commendation ; and, in this, their skill is beyond all comparison superior to that of any nation I have ever seen ; for theirs is not a slow and heavy style of melody, like that of the instrumental music of Britain, to which we are accustomed, but rapid and abrupt, yet, at the same time, sweet and pleasing in its...
Page 233 - I dare be bold to say, there were scarce ever such strokes given in Europe, as were given that day by the Highlanders. Many of General Mackay's officers and soldiers were cut down through the skull and neck to the very...
Page 60 - ... diapente,) it is always begun in a soft and delicate manner, and ended in the same, so that all may be perfected in the sweetness of delicious sounds. They enter on and again leave their modulations with so much subtlety, and the vibrations of the smaller strings of the treble sport with so much articulation and brilliancy along with the deep notes of the bass ; they delight with so much delicacy, and soothe so charmingly, that the greatest excellency of their art appears to lie in the perfect...
Page 233 - James's interest would be lost in Scotland. But no argument could dissuade him from engaging at the head of his troops. General Mackay's army out-winged Dundee's near a quarter of a mile, which obliged the Clans to leave large intervals between each Clan ; and by declining towards the wings, they wanted troops to charge the centre, where a detachment of Lesly and Hastings
Page 61 - O Oscar ! bend the strong in arms ; but spare the feeble hand. Be thou a stream of many tides against the foes of thy people ; but like the gale that moves the grass, to those who ask thine aid. So Trenmor lived ; such Trathal was ; and such has Fingal been. My arm was the support of the injured; the weak rested behind the lightning of my steel.
Page 27 - We read of missionaries * in Central America who attempted to write down the language of savage tribes, and who compiled with great care a dictionary of all the words they could lay hold of. Returning to the same tribe after the lapse of only ten years, they found that this dictionary had become antiquated and useless.

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