A Treatise on the Potatoe: With an Essay to Show the Cause of the Disease and to Suggest Its Remedy

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J.B. Chisholm, 1852 - Potatoes - 46 pages
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Page 12 - It is with no small degree of pleasure that I am enabled to send you some specimens of the solanum tuberosum, or native wild potato of South America. It is found growing in considerable quantities in ravines in the immediate neighborhood of Valparaiso, on the western side of South America, in latitude 34 degrees south.
Page 15 - Forfar, in or about the year 1730, related that the roots had been merely heated, and that they adhered to the teeth like glue, while their flavour was far from agreeable. The food was about to be condemned through the ignorance of the cook, when the accidental arrival of a gentleman who had tasted a potato in Lancashire, caused the rejected roots to be remanded back to the hot turf ashes, till they became as dainty as they had before been nauseous.
Page 8 - ... States. Although potato mosaic, named as such, has been reported for the first time within the last decade, the following statement made by Johnson (4) before the middle of the nineteenth century is of interest. In a description of a potato disease which seems to have somewhat resembled mosaic he says: The stem is unbranched, brownish green or mottled, and here and there sprinkled with rusty spots, which penetrate to the pith, so that it is not white but rust colored or sometimes black. The upper...
Page 11 - I have lately received from Mr. Pavon very fine wild specimens of Solanum tuberosum, collected by himself in Peru.
Page 21 - ... cuttings, is obviously a mode which nature does not employ; and this multiplication, as well as that produced by roots and layers, seems merely to operate as an extension of the life of an individual, and not as a reproduction of the species, as happens by seed. All plants increased by the former means retain precisely the peculiar qualities of the individual to which they owe their origin...
Page 4 - are round, some as large as a walnut, others much larger; they grow in damp soil, many hanging together, as if fixed on ropes; they are good food, either boiled or...
Page 11 - Chili, and that wild specimens found there have not been accidentally propagated from any cultivated variety. In that country it is generally found in steep, rocky places, where it could never have been cultivated, and where its accidental introduction is almost impossible. It is very common about Valparaiso, and I have noticed it along the coast for fifteen leagues to the northward of that port; how much farther it may extend north or south, I know not. It...
Page 6 - ... in one soil, that has a sweet, agreeable one in another. In a heavy, wet soil, or a rank, black loam, though the crop is often fine and abundant, it is scarcely ever palatable. Silicious soils, even approaching to gravel, though in these last the tubers are usually corroded or scabby, are always to be planted in preference to the above. A dry, mouldy, fresh and moderately rich soil is unquestionably the best for every variety of the potato. The black skinned and rough red thrive better than any...
Page 11 - ... specimens found there have not been accidentally propagated from any cultivated variety. In that country it is generally found in steep, rocky places, where it could never have been cultivated, and where its accidental introduction is almost impossible. It is very common about Valparaiso, and I have noticed it along the coast for fifteen leagues to the northward of that port; how much farther it may extend north or south, I know not. It chiefly inhabits the...
Page 10 - ... embracing at one view the influence of man on nature, and the re-action of the physical world on man, appears to read in the distribution of the vegetables the history of the first migrations of our species. I have first to observe, stating here only what facts are to be relied on, that the potatoe is not indigenous in Peru, and that it is nowhere to be found wild in the part of the Cordilleras situated under the tropics.

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