A Treatise on Uterine Displacements

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Otis Clapp & Son., 1883 - Uterus - 83 pages
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Page 80 - ... therefore, that there is a galvanic action set up, and the stimulating effects are due partly to this, and partly to the interior of the uterus being constantly bathed in a weak solution of chloride of zinc. However produced, it is certain that the uterus rapidly enlarges under the action, and there is every reason to believe that the ovaries take part in the increased activity. If once the uterus becomes accustomed to the presence of the galvanic stem, it may be worn for many months, and the...
Page 77 - I was led to condemn, in these articles, the use of the intra-uterine stem. But, since then, a riper experience has taught me a good deal about this pessary, and has wholly changed my views with regard to its use. I now hold that there are certain stubborn cases of anteflexion, and, for the matter of that, of retroflexion too, which can be satisfactorily treated in no other way than by this stem.
Page 43 - A considerable proportion of the women were school-teachers in broken health, seeking in the new profession a better means of living. The average health of the women was, in the beginning, lower than that of the men. But, with the removal of the corset and the long, heavy skirts, and the use of those exercises which a short and very loose dress renders easy, a remarkable change ensued.
Page 43 - ... in broken health, seeking in the new profession a better means of living. The average health of the women was, in the beginning, lower than that of the men. But, with the removal of the corset and the long, heavy skirts, and the use of those exercises which a short and very loose dress renders easy, a remarkable change ensued. In every one of the ten classes of graduates, the best gymnast was a woman. In each class there were from two to six women superior to all the men.
Page 79 - ... beyond doubt, and, if it remain within bounds, it is in a large number of cases beneficial. A large experience has shown me that it is only in occasional instances that the stem cannot be borne, and that, if carefully watched during the first few weeks of its use, these cases are easily eliminated. In a case where I have been led to regard the use of the stem as advisable, I always begin with a small size, and after this has been worn for two or three months, I change it for a larger one. For...
Page 79 - ... directly due to it, more especially epilepsy. In hospital practice I have seen a large number of cases of epilepsy due to menstrual suppression or insufficiency, and which have completely recovered as soon as the function has been properly established. " Stricture of the cervical canal, save in wellmarked cases of arrest of development, or from traumatic causes, is not at all frequent, though stricture of either of, its orifices is very common, especially that of the external os, already described....
Page 77 - ... riper experience has taught me a good deal about this pessary, and has wholly changed my views with regard to its use. I now hold that there are certain stubborn cases of anteflexion, and, for the matter of that, of retroflexion too, which can be satisfactorily treated in no other way than by this stem. Not a month now passes without finding one or more of my patients under its use.
Page 43 - But, with the removal of the corset and the long, heavy skirts, and the use of those exercises which a short and very loose dress renders easy, a remarkable change ensued. In every one of the ten classes of graduates, the best gymnast was a woman. In each class there were from two to six women superior to all the men. In exhibiting the graduating classes from year to year on the platform of Tremont Temple, women were uniformly placed in the more conspicuous situations, not because they were women,...
Page 78 - ... cases of amenorrhoea or dysmenorrhoea, we constantly find that the uterus, and also its associated organs, have been insufficiently developed, and have retained more or less of their infantile characters. This condition is readily to be diagnosed by the state of the cervix. It is small and nipple-like, the canal being correspondingly contracted, and there is almost always a marked degree of anteflexion. Very many instances of the ' infantile uterus ' will be met with in young women, otherwise...
Page 43 - The Boston Normal School for Physical Education trained and graduated 421 teachers of the new School of Gymnastics. The graduates were about equally divided between the sexes. A considerable proportion of the women were school-teachers in broken health, seeking in the new profession a better means of living. The average health of the women was, in the beginning, lower than that of the men. But, with the removal of the corset and the long, heavy skirts, and the use of those exercises which a short...

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