A universal history of the United States of America: embracing the whole period, from the earliest discoveries, down to the present time. Giving a description of the western country ...

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Ezra Strong, 1831 - History - 494 pages
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The text of the 1828 first edition of this book is essentially identical to the 1831 edition. Google has also scanned an 1829 edition of this book. The author of the 1828 and 1829 version is listed as "A Citizen of the United States" which is a known pseudonym of Alexander Hill Everett (1792-1847). The author of all later editions of this book is listed as "C. B. Taylor". I believe this constitutes proof that Everett used this pen name for his later publications. This pseudonym continued to be used long after his death in several later editions of the same book ending in 1880. I own copies of the 1828 edition and most of the later editions.
Wikipedia states he was a graduate of Harvard and personal assistant to John Quincy Adams and a Boston "man of letters" He was later ambassador to Spain and later China where he died. His brother was Secretary of State for Pres. Adams.
 

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Page 398 - We owe it, therefore, to candor, and to the amicable relations existing between the United States and those powers to declare, that we should consider any attempt on their part to extend their system to any portion of this hemisphere as dangerous to our peace and safety.
Page 251 - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none; the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies; the preservation of the general government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad...
Page 29 - Faith, etc., having undertaken, for the glory of God and advancement of the Christian faith, and honor of our King and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia...
Page 251 - ... freedom of religion, freedom of the press, and freedom of person, under the protection of the Habeas Corpus; and trial by juries impartially selected. These principles form the bright constellation which has gone before us, and guided our steps through an age of revolution and reformation.
Page 398 - With the movements in this hemisphere we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes which must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the allied powers is essentially different in this respect from that of America...
Page 236 - WELCOME, mighty chief, once more Welcome to this grateful shore ; Now no mercenary foe Aims again the fatal blow ; Aims at THEE the fatal blow. " Virgins fair and matrons grave, Those thy conquering arms did save, Build for THEE triumphal bowers. Strew, ye fair, his way with flowers, Strew your Hero's way with flowers.
Page 251 - ... a well-disciplined militia, our best reliance in peace, and for the first moments of war, till regulars may relieve them; the supremacy of the civil over the military authority...
Page 31 - Who raised up the righteous man from the east, called him to his foot, gave the nations before him, and made him rule over kings ? he gave them as the dust to his sword, and as driven stubble to his bow.
Page 168 - But lest some unlucky event should happen unfavorable to my reputation, I beg it may be remembered by every gentleman in the room that I this day declare, with the utmost sincerity, I do not think myself equal to the command I am honored with.
Page 30 - The eternal God is thy refuge, And underneath are the everlasting arms : And he shall thrust out the enemy from before thee; And shall say, Destroy them.

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