A Village Politician: The Life-story of John Buckley

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John Charles Buckmaster
T. Fisher Unwin, 1897 - Great Britain - 357 pages
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Page 48 - For several weeks nothing was thought or talked about but going to America. The whole village was at work in packing and mending clothes. A farewell service was held in the Methodist Chapel, which was crowded, and the services lasted through night till daybreak. The following evening, in the glorious springtime of May, some thirty-three men, women, and children knelt down in the street, and, after a short prayer-meeting, marched through the village singing hymns. The whole village turned out, and...
Page 48 - It was read at the village inn and at the Methodist chapel every Sunday until it was nearly worn out. The Lord had now opened a door of escape. Special prayermeetings were held to know the Lord's will, which was that they should go. For several weeks nothing was thought about or talked about but going to America. The whole village was at work in packing and mending clothes. A farewell service was held in the Methodist chapel, which was crowded, and the services lasted through night till daybreak.
Page 79 - Farmer, hath put himself & by these presents doth voluntarily and of his own free will and accord and by and with the consent of his Father and Mother put himself as an Apprentice unto William Clark of Freehold in Monmouth Co.
Page 49 - God bless you!" rang from every cottage door. Every eye was wet. Mr. Tapper leaned over the Eectory gate and was visibly affected with this melancholy procession of his best parishioners. Prayers in the Methodist chapel were regularly offered up for the exiles until news came of their safe arrival and settlement. This induced others, in batches of threes and fours, to follow for several years.
Page 180 - That proudly stalks along : Overlooks the crowd below, In brazen armour strong ? Loudly of his strength he boasts : On his sword and spear relies : Meets the God of Israel's hosts, And all their force defies.
Page 246 - I was utterly ignorant, and to read it with the aid of a dictionary involved an amount of work and time which I could ill afford. I did, however, manage after a fashion to translate one or two sentences. Was this book given to me as a joke, or by mistake for some theological work ? I devoted...
Page 208 - ... the skin. If the eye-piece of a telescope touched the face, it occasioned an intense burning pain ; the remedy was to cover them and other instruments with soft leather. The officers, notwithstanding, indulged themselves in walking for an hour or two in the middle of the day, in the depth of winter, even when the thermometer was down to...
Page 79 - ... unlawfully to any. He shall not commit fornication, nor contract matrimony within the said term. He shall not play at cards, dice, tables, or any other unlawful games, whereby his said Master may have any loss. With his own goods or others, during the said term, without licence of his said Master, he shall neither buy nor sell. He shall not haunt taverns nor play-houses, nor absent himself from his said Master's service day or night unlawfully ; but in.
Page 47 - Fortunately a circumstance occurred which now more than anything else changed the whole state of affairs. One of the farmers who had emigrated to America (in 1841) wrote a glowing account of the country and its prospects urging all who could to come over to Iowa. The letter was read in almost every cottage. It was read at the village inn and at the Methodist chapel every Sunday until it was nearly worn out. The Lord...
Page 227 - Wackem took me to see one of the Cogers, who lodged in a small room off Chancery Lane. He was wanted for a large meeting at Kennington, for which he would be paid a guinea. The room was foul and wretched in the extreme. On a piece of dirty bedding in the corner, partly undressed, the man who could hold an audience equal to O'Connell was lying stricken down and helpless as a child.

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