A Vindication of the Rights of the Commons of England

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Printed, and are to be sold by J. Nutt, 1701 - Impeachments - 40 pages
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Page 17 - As to the setting of the Great Seal of England to foreign alliances, the Lord Chancellor, or Lord Keeper for the time being, has a plain rule to follow ; that is, humbly to inform the King that he cannot legally set the Great Seal of England to a matter of that consequence unless the same be first debated and resolved in Council ; which method being observed, the Chancellor is safe, and the Council answerable.
Page 39 - Parliament upon pretence of presenting or delivering any petition, complaint, remonstrance or declaration or other addresses accompanied with excessive number of people, nor at any one time with above the number of ten persons, upon pain of incurring a penalty not exceeding the sum of one hundred pounds in money and three months imprisonment without bail or mainprize for every offence, which offence to be prosecuted at the Court of King's Bench or at the assizes or general quarter-sessions within...
Page 39 - Houses of Parliament for alteration of matters established by law in Church or State, unless the matter thereof have been first consented unto and ordered by three or more justices of...
Page 9 - ... of which they were bound to advise him, at least not to serve him in the contrary. And the lords being trusted with a...
Page 37 - Of the nature and excellency of the government of England, by King, Lords, and Commons.
Page 10 - ... acts contrary to their duties, and the true intent and meaning of this Act, for which there is not by this Act any penalty given or appointed, then it shall and may be lawful for any person or persons whatsoever, in the behalf of the poor of such city, borough or parish, to exhibit his petition to the Lord Chancellor or Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, for the time being, touching the same : which Lord Chancellor, or Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, for the time being, shall...
Page 17 - ... perhaps the war was resolved in a private cabal, and only declared in Privy Council, and published with that authority to the people, which is an abuse of the Constitution. It is true that an alliance made by the King-, and sealed with the Great Seal of England, may be good and valid in law, and so accepted by all foreign Princes, whether the treaty was concluded, and the Great Seal affixed to it, by the advice of the Privy Council or not; but this does not lessen but rather aggravates the crime...
Page 39 - ... for any remedy to be thereupon had ; nor to extend to any address whatsoever to his majesty, by all or any of the members of both or either houses of parliament, during the sitting of parliament, but that they may enjoy their freedom of access to his majesty, as heretofore hath been used.
Page 10 - Attorney has pafs'd it, it goes to the Signet, the Cuftody whereof is in the Secretary of State, who being a Minifter in high Office is prefum'd by the Laws to be watchful for the King's Good, and to inquire into all Matters relating to the Weal Publick. He is prefum'd to be appriz'd of the Perfbns Merits to whom the Grant is to be made, andlikewife to...
Page 39 - ... or private grievance or complaint to any member or members of Parliament after his election and during the continuance of the Parliament, or to the king's...

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