A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: With Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects

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Garland Pub., 1974 - Political Science - 340 pages
3 Reviews
The First Edition of this Norton Critical Edition was both an acclaimed classroom text and ahead of its time. This Second Edition offers the best in Wollstonecraft scholarship and criticism since 1976, providing the ideal means for studying the first feminist document written in English.

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User Review  - readingthruthenight - LibraryThing

Okay, okay, admittedly I'm like, what (?) two weeks behind on this post! So much so, I thought about not actually writing it. I mean, aren't ya'll tired of reading about this antiquated text. BUT ... Read full review

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User Review  - Angelic55blonde - LibraryThing

I do not know how anyone can give this book a less than 5 star rating. This is the first feminist monograph and it is eloquant and easy to read. This is a classic, a must read and must own for anyone ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
27
Observations on the jiate of degradation
94
Animadversions on some of the writers
203
Copyright

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About the author (1974)

Mary Wollstonecraft was born in London on April 27, 1759. She opened a school in Newington Green with her sister Eliza and a friend Fanny Blood in 1784. Her experiences lead her to attack traditional teaching methods and suggested new topics of study in Thoughts on the Education of Girls. In 1792, she published A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, in which she attacked the educational restrictions that kept women ignorant and dependant on men as well as describing marriage as legal prostitution. In Maria or the Wrongs of Woman, published unfinished in 1798, she asserted that women had strong sexual desires and that it was degrading and immoral to pretend otherwise. In 1793, Wollstonecraft became involved with American writer Gilbert Imlay and had a daughter named Fanny. After this relationship ended, she married William Godwin in March 1797 and had a daughter named Mary in August. Wollstonecraft died from complications following childbirth on September 10, 1797. Her daughter Mary later married Percy Bysshe Shelley and wrote Frankenstein.

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