A Voyage to Mexico and Havanna: Including Some General Observations on the United States

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author, 1841 - Havana (Cuba) - 139 pages
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Page 11 - January; and the animals sleep all the year under the open sky. This mildness and agreeableness of climate under the torrid zone, is the effect of several natural causes, entirely unknown to the ancients, who believed it uninhabitable; and not well understood by some moderns, by whom it is esteemed unfavourable to those who live in it. The purity of the atmosphere, the smaller obliquity of the solar rays, and the longer stay of this luminary upon the horizon in winter, in comparison of other regions...
Page 11 - ... high mountains, the tops of which are always covered with snow, must of necessity be cold. All the other inland countries enjoy a climate so mild and benign, that they neither feel the rigour of winter nor the heats of summer. No other fire is necessary in winter than the sun's rays to give warmth : no other relief is wanted in the season of heat but the shade : the same clothing which covers men in the dog-days defends them in January ; and the animals sleep all the year under the open sky....
Page 11 - ... ancients, who believed it uninhabitable; and not well understood by some moderns, by whom it is esteemed unfavourable to those who live in it. The purity of the atmosphere, the smaller obliquity of the solar rays, and the longer stay of this luminary upon the horizon in winter, in comparison of other regions farther removed from the equator, concur to lessen the cold, and to prevent all that horror which disfigures the face of nature in other climes. During that season a serene sky and the natural...
Page 11 - The plentiful showers which frequently water the earth after mid-day . . . the high mountains continually loaded with snow, scattered here and there through the country of Anahuac; the cool winds which breathe from them in that season; and the shorter stay of the sun upon the horizon, compared with the circumstances of the temperate zone...
Page 11 - ... the smaller obliquity of the solar rays, and the longer stay of this luminary upon the horizon in winter, in comparison of other regions farther removed from the equator, concur to lessen the cold, and to prevent all that horror which disfigures the face of nature in other climes. During that season a serene sky and the natural delights of the country, are enjoyed ; whereas under the frigid, and even for the most part under the temperate zones, the clouds rob man of the prospect of heaven, and...
Page 77 - The last are commonly generous, and give with one hand what they take away with the other ; but the former are famished harpies, who, the more they have, the more eager they are to devour.

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