A Voyage to Senegal: Or, Historical, Philosophical, and Political Memoirs, Relative to the Discoveries, Establishments and Commerce of Europeans in the Atlantic Ocean, from Cape Blanco to the River of Sierra Leone. To which is Added an Account of a Journey from Isle St. Louis to Galam

Front Cover
R. Phillips, 1806 - Africa, Northwest - 181 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 105 - From these details it will be seen, that chastity / ' * • ' is a virtue highly esteemed among the Africans, at least till marriage ; but from that moment it is a trait of unpoliteness and want of education in a woman to resist the importunities of a lover ; she would indeed be punished if discovered, but her reputation would remain unsullied.
Page 104 - The women are frequently hostages for alliance and peace; and the chiefs of two tribes, who have been at war, cement their treaties by an exchange of their daughters: private individuals do the same; and this circumstance may be the reason why the chiefs, in particular, have such a great number of women. A girl is frequently betrothed to a man as soon as she is born.
Page 99 - ... low moral condition ascribed to the peoples of West Africa by Captain Burton is amply confirmed by other travellers.1 Probably the character given to them by Durand is about correct. He declares that " the character of the blacks is nearly the same everywhere : they are indolent, except when animated by the desire of vengeance ; implacable, perfidious, and dissimulating when they have received an injury, in order that they may find an opportunity of avenging it with impunity. On the other hand,...
Page 105 - ... chastity is a virtue highly esteemed among the Africans, at least till marriage ; but from that moment it is a trait of unpoliteness and want of education in a woman to resist the importunities of a lover ; she would indeed be punished if discovered, but her reputation would remain unsullied. Among the black savages of Africa we find the customs which are prevalent in Italy and Spain, for each negro lady has a cicisbeo or cortejo, whom she makes choice of and consults on all occasions. The husband...
Page 105 - ... bridegroom places on the road which the bride has to pass several persons with brandy and other refreshments ; for, if these articles be not furnished, the conductors of the bride will not advance a step further, though they may have got three parts on their journey. On approaching the town, they stop, till joined by the friends of the bridegroom, who testify their joy by shouting, drinking, and firing their guns.
Page 105 - On the day agreed on for the marriage, the bridegroom places on the road which the bride has to pass, several...
Page 77 - They could not get near enough to spear him ; and being little accustomed to this sort of hunting, they did not know the parts where he might be wounded with the greatest effect. The elephant could neither run away from nor approach his assailants ; he therefore, in despair, took up the • mud with his trunk, and threw it in such quantities into the ship, that...
Page 106 - ... remarkable and truly extraordinary circumstance is, that the women never impose illegitimate children on their husbands, always declaring before accouchement who is the father. If, however, the husband wishes to have a child of his own by a woman he loves, he obliges her to swear she will be true to him for a certain time ; she takes the oath, and generally keeps it ; but if in the interval, either by violence or the persuasion of her lover, she breaks her promise, she confesses her fault immediately...
Page 117 - ... man with a black or a mulatto is not indissoluble, but only lasts during the pleasure of the parties, nor does a separation reflect any discredit. " A black woman in general thinks herself honoured in partaking of the touch of a white man, and is true, submissive, and grateful, to the utmost; in short, she uses every art to merit his kindness and love. If the husband embark to cross the sea, the disconsolate wife accompanies him to the shore, and sometimes follows him by swimming a considerable...
Page 94 - ... back to the village with the same forms used as at leaving it ; and, when arrived, they are received by all the women therein quite naked, and in this state they parade the streets with musical instruments by day-light. Their return from the wood is succeeded by a month's probation, during which time they are each day conducted in procession, accompanied by music, and covered from head to foot, to the houses of the principal inhabitants, where they sing and dance till the owner makes each of...

Bibliographic information