A Woman's Hardy Garden

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Macmillan, 1904 - Gardening - 216 pages
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Page 219 - Gardens," etc. CLOTH. CROWN 8vo. $2.50, net. PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED "One of the most charming books of this season ... is filled with beautiful garden scenes, where sun-dials of all sorts, simple and ornate, mark the sunny hours amid roses. A fine rose scroll, adapted from a design in a psalter of 1492, embellishes the titlepage ; capitals taken from ancient and beautiful books enrich the chapter headings. All this, apart from the interest of the information imparted with graceful tact and the enthusiasm...
Page 2 - To have lived always in a garden "where grew every tree pleasant to the sight and good for food," to have known no other place, and then to have been driven forth into the great world without hope of returning! Oh! Eve, had you not desired wisdom, your happy children might still be tilling the soil of that blessed Eden. The first woman longed for knowledge, as do her daughters of to-day. When the serpent said that eating of the forbidden fruit would make them "as gods...
Page 2 - ... It enters largely into the composition of the blood, and juices of animals and plants ; forms an important ingredient in their organized structures, and bears a fixed and unalterable relation to their whole vital economy. It was the only beverage of the human family in their primeval state. In that garden, where grew ' every tree pleasant to the sight and good for food...
Page 199 - Unless a woman possesses a skin impervious to wind and sun, she is apt to come through the summer looking as red and brown as an Indian ; and if one is often out in the glare, about the only headgear that can be worn to prevent this, is the oldfashioned sunbonnet. With its poke before and cape behind, protecting the neck, one really cannot become sunburned, and pink ones are not so bad.
Page 219 - A fine rose scroll, adapted from a design in a psalter of 1492, embellishes the title-page; capitals taken from ancient and beautiful books enrich the chapter headings. All this, apart from the interest of the information imparted with graceful tact and the enthusiasm of a student." The Outlook: "It is really surprising to see how much of history, biography, and even literary interest — to say nothing of mysticism, astrology, and science — attaches to the subject of sun-dials. Mrs. Earle has...
Page 87 - ... the beds and borders can be kept free from weeds and in good condition if gone over with a trowel every five days, or once a week, the earth stirred thoroughly, and any weeds that may have grown taken out. It is particularly necessary, for a few weeks in the spring, to keep well ahead of the weeds. I always think of my sins when I weed. They grow apace in the same way and are harder still to get rid of.
Page 2 - ... called to town, and when driving through the squalid streets to the ferries or riding on the elevated road, one sees these gardens of the poor. Sometimes they are only a Geranium or two, or the gay Petunia. Often a tall Sun-flower, or a Tomato plant red with fruit. These efforts tell of the love for the growing things, and of the care that makes them live and blossom against all odds. One feels a thrill of sympathy with the owners of the plants, and wishes that some day their lot may be cast...
Page 1 - ELY. With forty-nine illustrations from photographs taken in the author's garden by Prof. CF Chandler. 1 2 mo. , cloth. A superbly illustrated volume, appealing especially to the many men and women whose love of flowers and all things green...
Page 69 - Pocticus a row of Sweet Williams, pink, white and very dark red; back of the Sweet Williams, Foxgloves; back of the Foxgloves, Peonies and Hydrangea grandiflora planted alternately; and back of these, a row of Hollyhocks.
Page 94 - Plant them at the back of the borders among the shrubbery, along fences, and in great clumps in any odd corner, or around buildings; they are never amiss, and always beautiful.

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