A Wrinkle in Time

Front Cover
Ariel Books, 1962 - Juvenile Fiction - 211 pages
47 Reviews
It was a dark and stormy night; Meg Murry, her small brother Charles Wallace, and her mother had come down to the kitchen for a midnight snack when they were upset by the arrival of a most disturbing stranger.

"Wild nights are my glory, " the unearthly stranger told them. "I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me sit down for a moment, and then I'll be on my way. Speaking of way, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract."

A tesseract (in case the reader doesn't know) is a wrinkle in time. To tell more would rob the reader of the enjoyment of Miss L'Engle's unusual book.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
33
4 stars
8
3 stars
5
2 stars
0
1 star
1

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

A Winkle in Time is a classic story that I loved as a child! The story is based on Meg and her family searching for her father. During their search, they encounter so many mystical creatures and situations. This is a great read for older elementary age children, as they are sure to identify with Meg's frustrations with authority, as well as other normal issues that kids her age face. 

A Must Read

User Review  - usmcwife - Target

a must read for all Christians. Read full review

All 7 reviews »

Contents

MRS WHATSIT
1
MRS WHO
19
MRS WHICH
34
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1962)

Author Madeleine L'Engle was born in New York City on November 29, 1918. She graduated from Smith College. She is best known for A Wrinkle in Time (1962), which won the 1963 Newbery Medal for best American children's book. While many of her novels blend science fiction and fantasy, she has also written a series of autobiographical books, including Two Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage, which deals with the illness and death of her husband, soap opera actor Hugh Franklin. In 2004, she received a National Humanities Medal from President George W. Bush. She died on September 6, 2007 of natural causes. Since 1976, Wheaton College in Illinois has maintained a special collection of L'Engle's papers, and a variety of other materials, dating back to 1919.

Bibliographic information