Abbot's Ghost: A Christmas Story

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Louisa May Alcott, Stephen W. Hines
Harper Collins Christian Publisher, Sep 6, 2005 - Fiction - 128 pages
2 Reviews
Maurice Traherne is wrongly accused of fraud and gambling and must play a careful hand if he is to win his love, Octavia, from the grasp of other, less honorable men and retain the trust of those who had faith in him. Traherne is temporarily crippled saving the life of his well-born friend, Jaspar. Thus, Jaspar is assured of inheriting his father's estate, but it is expected that Traherne will inherit great wealth as gratitude for saving the heir. But--surprise!--on the death of Jaspar's father all are shocked to learn that Traherne has been disinherited: the will has been changed at the last minute and only the suffering Traherne knows why but won't tell and then he falls in love with Jaspar's sister, the fair Octavia. However, Octavia is forbidden to marry, as Traherne is penniless.

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User Review  - PhilSyphe - LibraryThing

This story is set over the Christmas period and New Year, featuring a complex plot, but complicated in a good way. Themes intertwine in an intriguing way, not an annoying way. I've never read anything ... Read full review

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User Review  - PitcherBooks - LibraryThing

Recommend this to anyone who enjoys period books as time machines or any Alcott fans. A quick read, more of a novella than a novel. Chiefly a mystery and romance novel though the setting is a grand ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
33
Section 3
46
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C. Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income. Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.

Stephen Hines has published both fiction and poetry but is best known as a "literary prospector" who has brought back forgotten works by famous children's author Laura Ingalls Wilder, and works by Louisa May Alcott, and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. His researches have taken him from the Herbert Hoover Library in West Branch, Iowa, to correspondence with British researchers dealing with the works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the United Kingdom. More than half a million copies of books he has collected and edited are in print, and he has had three bestsellers: Little House in the Ozarks, "I Remember Laura" , and The Quiet Little Woman . He continues to write fiction and poetry and has been a newspaper humor columnist for seven years.

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