Remarks on the Decision of the Appeal Court of South-Carolina, in the Case of Wells: And on the Abolition Movements at the North, Being a Series of Numbers Originally Published in the Charleston Mercury During the Month of August, 1835

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E.J. Van Brunt - Abolitionists - 57 pages
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Page 38 - The Jurisdiction of the State Courts is excluded in cases of crimes and offences cognizable under the authority of the United States, and in cases of suits for penalties and forfeitures incurred under the Laws of the United States.
Page 21 - and the Laws of the United States, made in pursuance thereof, are the supreme law of the land, and that the Judges in every State are bound thereby, any thing in the Constitution
Page 23 - law and equity arising under the Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or to be made, under their
Page 23 - be vested in one Supreme Court, and such Inferior Courts as Congress may, from time to time, ordain and establish.
Page 38 - Congress cannot vest any portion of the Judicial power of the United States except in Courts ordained and established by itself.
Page 36 - of the power itself, require that it should be exercised exclusively by Congress, the subject is as completely taken from the
Page 10 - that no part of the criminal jurisdiction of the United States can, consistently with the Constitution, be delegated to State tribunals.
Page 38 - No part of the criminal jurisdiction of the United States can, consistently with the Constitution, be delegated to State tribunals.
Page 38 - As regards crimes and offences, made so by legislative enactment, the Government of the United States stands in the same relation to the Sta,te Governments, as any foreign Government: and it is a fundamental maxim that the Courts of one Sovereignty will not take cognizance of, nor enforce, the
Page 38 - as to cases arising under the Constitution, Laws, and Treaties of the United States, the State Courts could not

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