Abraham Lincoln's DNA and Other Adventures in Genetics

Front Cover
CSHL Press, Mar 1, 2002 - Science - 339 pages
0 Reviews
For laypeople and professionals alike who yearn for a better understanding of genetically engineered crops, DNA fingerprinting, cloning, or gene therapy, here is a valuable addition to a small but critical literature that will frame the public discourse as it is decided how to use the burgeoning knowledge of the genome. The lessons are delivered in the course of fascinating historical tales (including an especially enjoyable chapter on Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec) with a hint of Lewis Thomas-like awe and fascination with the power of genetic analysis.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Abraham Lincoln Did He Have Marfan Syndrome?
3
Kings and Queens Genetic Diseases in Royal Families
15
ToulouseLautrec An Artist despite His Genes
27
Old Bones DNA and Skeletons
39
Justice The DNA Revolution in the Courts
51
DNA Detectives The New DNA Evidence
53
Cold Hits The Rise of DNA Felon Databanks
65
Genes and Violence Do Mutations Cause Crime?
79
Transgenic Animals New Foods and New Factories
173
Endangered Species New Genes Beat Extinction
187
Xenotransplantation Animal Organs to Save Humans
199
Diseases The Genetic Revolution in Medicine
211
Cystic Fibrosis Should Everyone Be Tested?
213
Breast Cancer The Burden of Knowing
223
Alzheimer Disease Are You at High Risk?
235
Gene Therapy The Dream and the Reality
247

Wrongful Birth What Should the Doctor Know?
93
Behavior Do Genes Make Us the Way We Are?
103
Mental Illness How Much Is Genetic?
105
Personality Were We Born This Way?
117
Talent Nature or Nurture?
131
Gay Genes Whats the Evidence?
145
Plants and Animals Genetic Engineering and Nature
155
Genetically Modified Organisms The Next Green Revolution?
157
Dilemmas Genetic Technologies and Individual Choice
261
Genetic Testing and Privacy Who Should Be Able to Know Your Genes?
263
Frozen Embryos People or Property?
277
Cloning Why Is Everyone Opposed?
289
Eugenics Can We Improve the Gene Pool?
303
Bibliography
317
Index
331
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - tall, lank, lean man considerably over 6 feet in height with stooping shoulders, long pendulous arms terminating in hands of extraordinary dimensions which, however, were far exceeded in proportion by his feet.
Page 7 - behind that eye. In the track of the wound were found fragments of bone which had been driven forward by the ball which was embedded in the anterior lobe of the left hemisphere of the brain.
Page 299 - each individual has a right to his or her own genetic identity and that human cloning is, and must continue to be, prohibited.
Page 166 - with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA),
Page 122 - progressed in certain moral qualities such as in affection, trustworthiness, temper, and probably in general intelligence.
Page 128 - It may be that trying to be happier is as futile as trying to be taller and therefore is counterproductive.
Page 19 - Davenport, Director of the Station for Experimental Evolution at Cold Spring Harbor, New York,
Page 285 - Ordinarily, the party wishing to avoid procreation should prevail, assuming that the other party has
Page 72 - murder. He was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. THE
Page 285 - reasonable possibility of achieving parenthood by means other than use of the preembryos in question.

References to this book

Bibliographic information