Absolutism and Society in Seventeenth-Century France: State Power and Provincial Aristocracy in Languedoc

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Cambridge University Press, 1985 - History - 375 pages
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Why was Louis XIV successful in pacifying the same aristocrats who had been troublesome for Richelieu and Mazarin? What role did absolutism play in reinforcing or changing the traditional social system in seventeenth-century France? This analysis of the provincial reality of absolutism argues that the answers to these questions lie in the relationship between the regional aristocracy and the crown. Starting with a critical examination of current approaches to state and society by institutional, social "Annales," and Marxist historians, the author calls for a new class analysis based on the findings of all these schools.
 

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Contents

VI
3
VII
6
VIII
10
IX
18
X
31
XI
34
XII
35
XIII
42
XLI
198
XLII
199
XLIII
202
XLIV
206
XLV
215
XLVI
221
XLVII
223
XLVIII
228

XIV
50
XV
57
XVI
59
XVIII
66
XIX
73
XX
77
XXII
85
XXIII
92
XXIV
98
XXV
99
XXVI
105
XXVII
117
XXVIII
119
XXIX
130
XXX
140
XXXI
147
XXXII
149
XXXIV
159
XXXV
167
XXXVI
176
XXXVII
179
XXXIX
187
XL
193
XLIX
234
L
245
LI
246
LII
251
LIII
258
LIV
270
LV
279
LVI
282
LVII
287
LVIII
297
LIX
303
LX
304
LXI
307
LXII
316
LXIII
329
LXIV
340
LXV
348
LXVI
353
LXVII
355
LXVIII
362
LXIX
369
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