Abstract of Hill's Rhetoric: English A in Harvard College

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W.H. Wheeler, 1888 - 33 pages
 

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Page 30 - The proprieties and delicacies of the English are known to few : it is impossible even for a good wit to understand and practise them without the help of a liberal education, long reading, and digesting of those few good authors we have amongst us, the knowledge of men and manners, the freedom of habitudes and conversation with the best company of both sexes; and in short, without wearing off the .rust which he contracted, while he was laying in a .stock of learning.
Page 30 - Thus it appears necessary, that a man should be a nice critic in his mother-tongue before he attempts to translate a foreign language. Neither is it sufficient, that he be able to judge of words and style ; but he must be a master of them too ; he must perfectly understand his author's tongue, and absolutely command his own.
Page 30 - So, then, we have the three ranks : the man who perceives rightly, because he does not feel, and to whom the primrose is very accurately the primrose, because he does not love it.
Page 31 - ... by which his poor human capacity of thought should be conquered, and brought into the inaccurate and vague state of perception, so that the language of the highest inspiration becomes broken, obscure, and wild in metaphor, resembling that of the weaker man, overborne by weaker things.
Page 32 - ... they are so hard to read. There is certainly some poetic feeling in them; and the welcome to the sun comes as near enthusiasm as is possible for a ploughman, with a good steady yoke of oxen, who lays over one furrow of verse, and then turns about to lay the next as cleverly alongside it as he can. But it is a wrong done to good taste to hold up this item kind of description any longer as deserving any other credit than that of a good memory. It is a mere bill of parcels, a post-mortem inventory...
Page 31 - And thus, in full, there are four classes : the men who feel nothing, and therefore see truly ; the men who feel strongly, think weakly, and see untruly (second order of poets) ; the men who feel strongly, think strongly, and see truly (first order of poets) ; and the men who, strong as human creatures can be, are yet submitted to influences stronger than they, and see in a sort untruly, because what they see is inconceivably above them. This last is the usual condition of prophetic inspiration.
Page 30 - ... sun, or a fairy's shield, or a forsaken maiden. And then, lastly, there is the man who perceives rightly in spite of his feelings, and to whom the primrose is for ever nothing else than itself — a little flower, apprehended in the very plain and leafy fact of it, whatever and how many soever the associations and passions may be, that crowd around it. And, in general, these three classes may be rated in comparative order, as the men who are not poets at all, and the poets of the second order,...
Page 30 - Ogilbys have translated? But I dare assure them that a good poet is no more like himself in a dull translation, than his carcass would be to his living body. There are many who understand Greek and Latin, and yet are ignorant of their mother tongue. The proprieties and delicacies of the English are known to few...
Page 22 - Two things resemble each other in one or more respects ; a certain proposition is true of the VOL. II. H one; therefore it is true of the other.
Page 31 - ... nothing else than itself— a little flower apprehended in the very plain and leafy fact of it, whatever and how many soever the associations and passions may be, that crowd around it. And, in general, these three classes may be rated in comparative order, as the men who are not poets at all, and the poets of the *• second order, and the poets of the first; only however great a man may be...

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