Abundance for What?

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers, 1964 - Social Science - 626 pages

This classic collection of essays by Riesman discusses the implications of affluence in America. Riesman maintains that the question that should be raised by wealth has shifted over time from how to obtain wealth to how to make use of it. Another key theme concerns issues relevant to higher education, such as academic freedom. This book examines the notion that America is not as open a society as it may appear to be; it shows how social science may be used to explain why this is so. In a brilliant, lengthy reevaluation Riesman both clarifies and revises that earlier assessment with unusual luster and candor.

 

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This collection of essays by David Riesman started a different but real view of the American society. Money is no more a medium but an end in itself. However further discourse on this factor lead us to know that more money more power is the mantra of affluent societies. David Riesman published a classic which is so relevant to explain developed and developing countries - how people live?, what they live for?.  

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Contents

The Impact of the Cold War
1
Preface
3
National Purpose
19
The American Crisis
28
Reflections on Containment and Initiatives
52
The Nylon War
67
Some Observations on the Limits of Totalitarian Power
80
Answers Given in a Partisan Review Symposium
93
Some Continuities and Discontinuities in the Education of Women
324
The Search for Challenge
349
Abundance for Whom?
369
Preface
371
The Social and Psychological Setting of Veblens Economic Theory
374
The Relevance of Thorstein Veblen
388
Reflection on Some Turks in Transition
402
The Oral Tradition the Written Word and the Screen Image
418

Abundance for What?
103
Preface
105
Careers and Consumer Behavior
113
A Career Drama in a Middleaged Farmer
138
Fusion or Polarity?
147
Leisure and Work in Postindustrial Society
162
Some Issues in the Future of Leisure
184
A Preliminary Formulation
196
The Suburban Dislocation
226
Flight and Search in the New Suburbs
258
Autos in America
270
Abundance for What?
300
The Found Generation
309
Social Science Research Problems Methods Opportunities
443
Preface
445
Law and Sociology
454
Tocqueville as Ethnographer
493
Introduction to Crestwood Heights
506
The Sociology of the Interview
517
Orbits of Tolerance Interviewers and Elites
540
Interviewers Elites and Academic Freedom
568
Some Observations on the American Case
584
Acknowledgments and Notes on Previous Publication
604
Index
611
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