Academic Writing: An Introduction

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Broadview Press, Jun 3, 2005 - Reference - 304 pages
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Janet Giltrow's Academic Writing: Writing and Reading in the Disciplines has been widely acclaimed in all its editions as a superb textbook—and an important contribution to the pedagogy of introducing university and college students to the conventions of writing in an academic milieu. Academic Writing: An Introduction is a concise version of Giltrow's full work, designed to be more accessible as a text for certain sorts of one-term courses. The new book reorganizes the text into eleven short chapters, eliminating many of the readings and adapting the discussion and exercises. Much of the most strongly theoretical material has been abridged or recontextualized, and a glossary of key terms has been added. The resulting book, however, remains meaningfully informed by theory, especially genre theory. Like Academic Writing: Writing and Reading in the Disciplines, it also remains grounded in the particular; throughout the text examples of actual academic writing of the sort that students grapple with daily are presented and discussed.

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About the author (2005)

Janet Giltrow is Professor and Associate Head, Graduate Studies, in the English Department at the University of British Columbia. Her articles have appeared in such journals as American Literature, Sinn und Form, Style, Technostyle, Studies in the Novel, Modern Language Review and Technical Writing and Communication, and in collections on feminist narratology, genre theory, and ESL, as well as in collections on other topics in rhetoric and literary studies. She is a winner of the 3M Teaching Fellowship. Daniel Burgoyne and Richard Gooding teach in the English Department at the University of British Columbia, and are co-authors of the Canadian edition of the New Century Handbook. Marlene Sawatsky is a senior lecturer in the English Department at Simon Fraser University.

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