Accelerated VB 2005

Front Cover
Apress, Apr 30, 2007 - Computers - 414 pages

Accelerated VB 2005 provides the fastest path to Visual Basic expertise for anyone already familiar with object-oriented programming. While books introduce VB, very few also explain optimizing its use with the .NET common language runtime (CLR). But this book both teaches core VB language concepts and covers in depth the concepts and techniques for professionally exploiting the power of VB and the CLR.

You'll quickly master VB syntax while learning how the CLR simplifies many programming tasks. You'll also learn best practices that ensure your code will be efficient, reusable, and robust. Why spend many months or years discovering the best ways to design and code VB, when this book will show you how to do things the right way, right from the start?

  • Youll quickly gain thorough understanding of VB 2005.
  • This book covers the all new features of VB 2005.
  • Authors Guy Fouché and Trey Nash describe and explain VB best practices.
  • The book presents canonical forms for VB classes and interfaces.
  • Examples demonstrate bullet-proof, exception-safe code and efficient multithreaded applications.
 

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Contents

Conversion Operators
156
Boolean Operators
158
Summary
162
Exception Handling
163
Avoid Using Exceptions to Control Flow
164
Achieving Exception Neutrality
173
Creating Custom Exception Classes
184
Working with Allocated Resources and Exceptions
187

Understanding Assemblies
21
CrossLanguage Compatibility
30
Reflection
31
VB Syntax
33
Namespaces
48
Statements
51
Control Flow Constructs
52
SelectCase
53
Summary
56
Classes and Structures
57
Class Definitions
58
Partial Classes
72
Boxing and Unboxing
76
Efficiency and Confusion
81
Equality and What It Means
83
Destroying Objects
87
Exception Handling
88
Summary
92
Methods Properties and Fields
93
A Final Few Words on Overridable Methods
101
Fields
104
Summary
108
Inheritance Polymorphism and Encapsulation
109
Inheritance Containment and Delegation
115
Encapsulation
120
Summary
124
Interfaces
126
Defining Interfaces
127
Implementing Interfaces in Structures
133
Beware of Side Effects of Value Types Implementing Interfaces
134
Contracts
137
Choosing Between Interfaces and Classes
140
Polymorphism with Interfaces
144
Summary
145
Operator Overloading
147
Types and Formats of Overloaded Operators
148
Operators Shouldnt Mutate Their Operands
149
Does Parameter Order Matter?
150
Overloading the Addition Operator
151
Comparison Operators
152
Providing Rollback Behavior
191
Summary
194
Working with Strings
195
String Literals
196
Format Specifiers and Globalization
197
Working with Strings from Outside Sources
209
StringBuilder
211
Searching Strings with Regular Expressions
213
Summary
224
Arrays and Collections
226
Synchronization
229
Multidimensional Jagged Arrays
231
Collection Types
232
How Iteration Works
241
Summary
245
Delegates and Events
247
Delegate Creation and Use
248
Events
260
Summary
264
Generics
265
Generic Type Placeholder Naming Conventions
268
Constructed Types Control Accessibility
279
Generic System Collections
284
Select Problems and Solutions
286
Summary
300
Threading
302
Synchronizing Threads
316
Using the ThreadPool
340
Summary
347
Canonical Forms
349
ValueType Canonical Forms
395
Design Checklists
405
Summary
408
Resources
409
Articles
410
Running the Examples
411
A Few Words Regarding Modules
412
INDEX
413
Copyright

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Page 18 - Standard defines the Common Language Infrastructure (CLI) in which applications written in multiple high-level languages may be executed in different system environments without the need to rewrite the applications to take into consideration the unique characteristics of those environments.

About the author (2007)

Trey Nash is an escalation engineer at Microsoft working on the Windows operating systems as well as various other products. When he is not working feverishly within the bowels of the operating system, he is delivering training on .NET Platform debugging as well as user mode and kernel mode debugging on the Windows platform. Prior to working at Microsoft, he was a principal software engineer working on security solutions at Credant Technologies, a market-leading security software company. He also enjoined a stint at a large Bluetooth company developing Bluetooth solutions for the release of Microsoft Vista. Before that, he called Macromedia, Inc. home for five years. At Macromedia, he worked on a cross-product engineering team for several years, designing solutions for a wide range of products throughout the company, including Flash, Fireworks, and Dreamweaver. He specialized in COM/DCOM using C/C++/ATL until the .NET revolution. He's been glued to computers ever since he scored his first, a TI-99/4A, when he was a mere 13 years old. He astounded his parents by turning a childhood obsession into a decent-paying career, much to their dismay. Trey received his bachelor of science and his master of engineering degrees in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University. When he's not sitting in front of a computer, you can find him working in his garage, playing his piano, brushing up on a foreign language (Russian and Icelandic are the current favorites), or playing ice hockey.

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