Accessible Access 2000

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Springer Science & Business Media, Mar 25, 2004 - Business & Economics - 322 pages
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Written by the team who brought you "Inside Relational Databases". Bill Marklyn, as the development manager for the first two major releases of Access, oversaw the entire design and so provides an intimate knowledge of the product. Mark Whitehorn designs and builds databases but is best known for his popular and long running database column in the UK's "Personal Computer World".

"These two authors make a perfect team. Bill Marklyn knows the product inside out and Mark Whitehorn makes the information accessible." Neil Fawcett, Group Technical Editor, VNU Business Publications

"PCW and Amazon.co.uk contributor Mark Whitehorn is that rare combination - an expert in his field, databases, and a fine writer too, with a talent for honing a complex subject down to its essentials." Tamsin Todd - Computers & Internet Editor, Amazon.co.uk

Accessible Access 2000 assumes that you start with no knowledge of Access or databases and takes you to the point where you can create and use a multi-table database. (For more information, see chapter one). It is written in the highly readable style of the authors' previous book; a style that was much appreciated by readers:

" "Inside Relational Databases" is excellent. It is clearly and concisely written and full of humorous asides which ease the reader through an otherwise weighty topic. Probably the most engaging technical book I have read." Paul McGowan

"As a result of ordering and studying your excellent book, "Inside Relational Databases", it is now required reading for all my students. This e-mail is simply to say thank you for a superb and understandable publication. I've learned a lot from it, and I'm sure my delegates will too." Ian Wilshaw

 

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Contents

introduction
3
So what do we cover?
5
How do we work?
6
What do you have?
7
Sample flies
8
Whats in a name?
9
Disclaimer
10
Getting started
11
Designing your form
159
Summary
168
Forms again controlling data entry Data validation
169
Form controls introduced
170
Overview of controlling form controls
171
Types of form control
174
Further controls
192
Summary
197

The Database wizard or not
13
The database window
14
Tables the fundamental building blocks
15
Forms and their function
17
Queries questions questions questions
19
Reports printed output from a database
20
A brief summary of the big four
21
Tables for storing your data
22
Building a table by entering data
30
Adding records
32
Field names
33
Queries finding data Why you need to use queries
35
Using the Query wizard
36
The Query Design tool
38
Finding the right records
43
Saving data with a maketable query
51
Summary
53
Forms viewing and entering data
54
Really rapid form creation
55
Using the Form wizard
57
Creating different types of form
58
Forms performing calculations
60
Multiple forms per table
65
Summary
66
Reports printing your data
67
Printing a report
72
Summary
73
The story so far
74
Creating handcrafted databases
75
Exploring tables in more depth What more could you possibly need to know?
77
Primary keys
78
Data types
79
Summary so far
95
Controlling data entry
96
Input masks the background
97
Investigating the main properties of fields
99
Choosing the right data type means leaner faster databases up to a point
108
Summary
109
And now more about the properties of a field
111
Postal codes again and phone numbers
113
Tapping the power of Access queries Queries are much more powerful than they first appear
115
The main types of query
116
Using a query to perform calculations
139
Can you edit the data in an answer table?
141
Refining queries to home in more precisely upon records
142
Closure and making further use of queries
147
Summary
151
Forms again design
152
The Chart wizard
153
The PivotTable wizard
155
Reports again customizing printed output Report types
198
The Report wizard again
199
The Label wizard
203
The Chart wizard
205
Building a customized report
206
What else can you do on a report?
207
Formatting your report
215
Where are we now? Single tables for simple databases
216
More complex databases
219
Multiple table databases More is better
221
Deciding what data goes into which table
223
Using the Table Analyzer wizard
227
Summary
237
Tables making multiple tables work together
238
Primary keys
239
Joins and foreign keys
240
Joining tables
242
How joins affect tables and forms
246
Indexing
247
Join types
248
Editing joins
250
Summary
251
Tables a complete multitable database Data divide and conquer
252
Building the tables
253
Adding primary keys
255
Joining the tables
256
Objects
257
Queries finding data from multiple tables Check out the data
258
Multiple table queries
259
The effea of joins on queries
261
Basing a query on a query
266
Summary
267
Forms your interface to multiple tables Forms and functions
269
Another form based on multiple tables
274
Summary
289
Reports printing data from multiple tables Basing reports on queries
290
Adding a watermark
292
Summary
293
Producing a user interface for your database Not just a pretty face
294
Form control without programming
296
Designing a user interface
297
A seamless whole
303
A far from perfect UI
304
Summary
305
You mean theres even more?
306
Modules and macros
308
Projects
311
Summary
312
index
313
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Bill Marklyn, as the Development Manager for the first three versions of Access, oversaw the entire design and so provides an intimate knowledge of the product.

Mark Whitehorn designs and builds databases but is best known for his popular and long running database column in the UK magazine, Personal Computer World (PCW).

Bill Marklyn, as the Development Manager for the first three versions of Access, oversaw the entire design and so provides an intimate knowledge of the product. Mark Whitehorn designs and builds databases but is best known for his popular and long running database column in the UK magazine, Personal Computer World (PCW).

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