Accountability for Criminal Justice: Selected Essays

Front Cover
Philip C. Stenning
University of Toronto Press, 1995 - Law - 530 pages
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Accountability, the idea that people, governments, and business should be held publicly accountable, is a central preoccupation of our time. Criminal justice, already a system for achieving public accountability for illegal and antisocial activities, is no exception to this preoccupation, and accountability for criminal justice therefore takes on a special significance. Seventeen original essays, most commissioned for this volume, have been collected to summarize and assess what has been happening in the area of accountability for criminal justice in English-speaking democracies with common-law traditions during the last fifteen years. Looking at the issue from a variety of disciplines, the authors' intent is to explore accountability with respect to all phases of the criminal justice system, from policing to parole.

 

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Contents

A Psychological Perspective
15
Accountability in the Ministry of the Solicitor General of Canada
44
Antinomies of Accountability in Policing
74
Getting Serious about Police Brutality
93
The Role of Public Complaints
110
The News Media and Account Ability in Criminal Justice
135
Security Services Constitutional Structure and Varieties
162
Parliaments FiveYear Review of the CSIS
185
Canadian Public Inquiries and Accountability
268
J EDWARDS
294
Prosecutorial Accountability in Canada
330
Judicial Accountability in Canada
355
Achieving Accountability in Sentencing
376
Accountability and Justice in the English Prison System
397
Accountability and the National Parole Board
422
Prospects for Accountability in Canadian Aboriginal Justice Systems
449

Accountability for Corporate Crime
213
Examples from Securities Regulation
239
Cases
479
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About the author (1995)

Philip C. Stenning is a professor with the Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto.

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