Across Asia on a Bicycle: The Journey of Two American Students from Constantinople to Peking

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Century Company, 1894 - Asia - 234 pages
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Page 47 - Of the two separate peaks, called Little and Great Ararat, which are separated by a chasm about seven miles in width, Sir Robert thus speaks ; — ' These inaccessible summits have never been trodden by the foot of man, since the days of Noah, if even then, for my idea is that the ark rested in the space between these heads, and not on the top of either. Various attempts have been made in different ages to ascend these tremendous mountain...
Page 33 - Accomplisher of the important Transactions of Mankind with intelligence and good sense, Consolidator of the Edifice of Empire and of Glory, endowed by the Most High with abundant gifts, and Moushir, at this time, of my gate of felicity, my Vizier Mehmed Pasha, may God be pleased to preserve him long in exalted dignity.
Page 226 - They say, after a good account of Li's audience chamber and person : " Under the scraggy mustach • we could distinguish a rather benevolent though determined mouth ; while his small, keen eyes, which were somewhat sunken, gave forth a flash that was perhaps but a flickering ember of the fire they once contained. The left eye, which was partly closed by a paralytic stroke several years ago, gave him a rather artful, waggish appearance. The whole physiognomy was that of a man of strong intuition,...
Page 48 - I am persuaded that there is not a person living within sight of Ararat, unless possibly some exceptionally educated Russian official in Erivan, who believes that any human foot since Father Noah's has trodden that sacred summit. So much stronger is faith than sight ; or rather, perhaps, so much stronger is prejudice than evidence.
Page 192 - Hoangti's original work still survives. Nearly all the eastern section, from Ordos to the Yellow Sea, was rebuilt in the fifth century, and the double rampart along the northwest frontier of the plains of Peking was twice restored in the fifteenth and sixteenth. North of Peking, where this prodigious...
Page 159 - ... glowing sunset, at the end of a hot day's climb, we looked for the last time over the Hi valley, and at dusk, an hour later, rolled into one of the Kirghiz aouls that are here scattered among the rich pasturage of the plateau. Even here we found that our reputation had extended from Kuldja. The chief advanced with amans of welcome, and the heavy-matted curtains in the kibitka doorway were raised, as we passed, in token of honor. When the refreshing kumiss was served around the evening campfire,...
Page 182 - ... and relieved here and there by patches of wiry shrubs, used as fuel at the desert stations, or lines of hillocks succeeding each other like waves on the surface of the shoreless deep. The wind, even more than the natural barrenness of the soil, prevents the growth of any vegetation except low, pliant herbage. Withered plants are uprooted and scattered by the gale like patches of foam on the stormy sea. These terrible winds, which of course were against us, with the frequently heavy cart-tracks,...
Page 232 - Were you not rash in attempting such a journey ? Suppose you had been killed out in the interior of Asia, no one would ever have heard of you again.' " ' Are you Democrats or Republicans ? ' (The Viceroy showed considerable knowledge of our government and institutions.) " ' Will you run for any political office in America ? Do you ever expect to get into Congress ? ' " ' Do you have to buy offices in America?' was the last inquiry. "There was considerable hesitancy on the part of us both to answer...
Page 1 - Across Asia on a bicycle; the journey of two American students from Constantinople to Peking.
Page 181 - August 10 when we drew up to the hamlet of Shang-loo-shwee at the end of the Hami oasis. The Great Gobi, in its awful loneliness, stretched out before us, like a vast ocean of endless space. The growing darkness threw its mantle on the scene, and left imagination to picture for us the nightmare of our boyhood days. We seemed, as it were, to be standing at the end of the world, looking out into the realm of nowhere. Foreboding thoughts disturbed our repose, as we contemplated the four hundred miles...

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