Across Asia on a Bicycle: The Journey of Two American Students from Constantinople to Peking

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T. Fisher Unwin, 1894 - Asia - 234 pages
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Page 47 - Of the two separate peaks, called Little and Great Ararat, which are separated by a chasm about seven miles in width, Sir Robert thus speaks ; — ' These inaccessible summits have never been trodden by the foot of man, since the days of Noah, if even then, for my idea is that the ark rested in the space between these heads, and not on the top of either. Various attempts have been made in different ages to ascend these tremendous mountain...
Page 226 - They say, after a good account of Li's audience chamber and person : " Under the scraggy mustach • we could distinguish a rather benevolent though determined mouth ; while his small, keen eyes, which were somewhat sunken, gave forth a flash that was perhaps but a flickering ember of the fire they once contained. The left eye, which was partly closed by a paralytic stroke several years ago, gave him a rather artful, waggish appearance. The whole physiognomy was that of a man of strong intuition,...
Page 33 - ABDUL MEDJID, Granted in favour of His Protestant Subjects. Most honoured Vizier, illustrious Counsellor, Maintainer of the good order of the world, Director of Public Affairs with wisdom and judgment, Accomplisher of the important Transactions of Mankind with intelligence and good sense, Consolidator of the Edifice of Empire and of Glory, endowed by the Most High with abundant gifts, and Moushir...
Page 192 - Hoangti's original work still survives. Nearly all the eastern section, from Ordos to the Yellow Sea, was rebuilt in the fifth century, and the double rampart along the northwest frontier of the plains of Peking was twice restored in the fifteenth and sixteenth. North of Peking, where this prodigious...
Page 182 - ... the same interminable picture of vast undulating plains of shifting reddish sands, interspersed with quartz pebbles, agates, and carnelians, and relieved here and there by patches of wiry shrubs, used as fuel at the desert stations, or lines of hillocks succeeding each other like waves on the surface of the shoreless deep. The wind, even more than the natural barrenness of the soil, prevents the growth of any vegetation except low, pliant herbage. Withered plants are uprooted and scattered by...
Page 171 - Thousands of thumbs were uplifted that afternoon, in praise of the wonderful twee-tali-cheli; or two-wheeled carts, as they witnessed our modest attempt at trick riding and special maneuvering. After refreshments in the palace, to which we were invited by the viceroy, we were counseled to leave by a rear door, and return by a roundabout way to the inn, leaving the mob to wait till dark for our exit from the front. The restaurant or tea-house in China takes the place of the Western club-room.
Page 162 - July sun against which even our felt caps were not much protection, we were half-dragging, halfpushing, our wheels through a foot of sand, and slapping at the mosquitos swarming upon our necks and faces. These pests, which throughout this low country are the largest and most numerous we have ever met, are bred in the intermediate swamps, which exist only through the negligence of the neighboring villagers. At night smoldering fires, which half suffocate the human inmates, are built before the doors...
Page 196 - Lands,' the arable regions of China havo maintained their fruitfulness for over four thousand years, entirely through the thoughtful care of the peasantry in restoring to the soil under another form all that the crops have taken from it. Nothing is wasted.
Page 170 - ... had ever been in. By no possibility could we mount our machines, although the mob was growing more and more impatient. They kept shouting for us to ride, but would give us no room. Those on the outside pushed the inner ones against us. With the greatest difficulty could we preserve our equilibrium, and prevent the wheels from being crushed, as we surged along toward the palace gate; while all the time our Russian interpreter, Mafoo, on horseback in front, continued to shout and gesticulate in...
Page 48 - No," said the ecclesiastical dignitary; "that cannot be. No one has ever been there. It is impossible." Mr. Bryce himself says : " I am persuaded that there is not a person living within sight of Ararat, unless it...

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