Acting

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1992 - Art - 135 pages
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While all value judgements about the arts are problematical, there does seem to be a special problem with acting. Everyone seems to be able to act. It seems to be the easiest of arts; if an art at all. Moreover the better the technique the easier it seems. This book examines society's conceptions of acting, the language it uses, and the criteria it employs to distinguish good acting from bad acting. It addresses itself to the intellectual problems associated with the idea of acting - distinguishing the actor from the character. It covers the range of contemporary actor training and practice from Stanislavski to the Post-Modern, and examines the spiritual and moral purpose fo acting within society. Acting integrates professional experience wiht intellectual enquiry.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1 Acting and the phenomenological problem
4
Chapter 2 Acting and semiotics
10
Chapter 3 Acting and athletics
18
Chapter 4 The psychology of acting
25
Chapter 5 The psychology in acting
32
skills
44
process
50
space and design
81
director and rehearsal
88
audience and critic
97
Chapter 12 Acting as danger and sacrifice
106
Coda
118
Notes
124
Select bibliography
128
Index
130

style
69

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