Acting for Animators: A Complete Guide to Performance Animation, Volume 1

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated, 2000 - Animated films - 125 pages
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"Until now, animators who have wanted to learn about acting have had no option but to study the subject side by side with stage and movie actors, a group that uses acting techniques in a wholly different way. Ed Hooks offers a better alternative with Acting for Animators, the first book about acting theory and technique written specifically for the animator." "Animators need to know a lot about acting, but they don't need to know everything. Acting for Animators sorts out the acting theory that animators need, presenting it in a form and with references that are more relevant to the animator's world. It explores the connections between thinking and physical action, between thinking and emotion; it provides the steps for an effective character analysis and the dynamics of a scene. Using references to animation and live action, acting principles are highlighted and explained. Plus, the accompanying CD-ROM provides explicit examples, including videoclips of improvs based on the seven essentials of acting and highlights of Rudolph Laban's movement theory."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Contents

Introduction
1
Seven Essential Acting Concepts
9
The Audience
19
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Ed Hooks is a professional actor, acting coach, and writer, whose past students include Heather Locklear and Teri Hatcher. As an actor, he has appeared in numerous commercials and television shows including Murder, She Wrote, Home Improvement, and Golden Girls. He has taught a class on acting for animators, including the animators for the hit film Antz. Hooks's works include The Audition Book; for the beginning and experienced actor, it explains how to give winning auditions for stage, film, commercials, or television shows. Each type of audition is thoroughly outlined and includes strategies for handling stage fright and locating an agent. His other books include The Ultimate Scene & Monologue Sourcebook, which references more than 1,000 scenes from hundreds of plays. Anyone interested in acting can benefit from the decades of experience Ed Hooks shares with the readers.

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