Active Knowledge Modeling of Enterprises

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Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 16, 2008 - Computers - 436 pages
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Enterprise Modeling has been defined as the art of externalizing enterprise knowledge, i.e., representing the core knowledge of the enterprise. Although useful in product design and systems development, for modeling and model-based approaches to have a more profound effect, a shift in modeling approaches and methodologies is necessary. Modeling should become as natural as drawing, sketching and scribbling, and should provide powerful services for capturing work-centric, work-supporting and generative knowledge, for preserving context and ensuring reuse. A solution is the application of Active Knowledge Modeling (AKM).

The AKM technology is about discovering, externalizing, expressing, representing, sharing, exploring, configuring, activating, growing and managing enterprise knowledge. An AKM solution is about exploiting the Web as a knowledge engineering medium, and developing knowledge-model-based families of platforms, model-configured workplaces and services.

This book was written by the inventors of AKM arising out of their cooperation with both scientists and industrial practitioners over a long period of time, and the authors give examples, directions, methods and services to enable new ways of working, exploiting the AKM approach to enable effective c-business, enterprise design and development, and lifecycle management. Industry managers and design engineers will become aware of the manifold possibilities of, and added values in, IT-supported distributed design processes, and researchers for collaborative design environments will find lots of stimulation and many examples for future developments.

 

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Contents

What is Active Knowledge Modeling Technology?
1
11 Definition of Active Knowledge Modeling
4
12 Stateoftheart Overview
7
13 Discoveries and Core Concepts
9
14 StateofPractice An Example
10
15 The AKM Products
14
17 Active Knowledge Architectures
16
171 How to Represent Enterprise Knowledge
17
735 Platform Configuration
209
736 Platform Delivery and Practicing
210
737 Performance Improvement and Operations
211
74 Service Teams
212
75 Integrated Product and Services Platforms
213
76 AKM Approach to Customer Projects
214
761 IRTV in Action
217
762 Current Context
222

172 ModelGenerated Workplaces MGWP
19
173 ModelBased Holistic Design
20
174 ModelBased Systems Engineering
21
19 Towards Enterprise Visual Scenes
22
191 Visual Scenes and Collaboration Spaces
23
192 The Powers of Visual Scenes
24
110 Implications and Impacts
25
Customer Challenges and Demands
27
212 The Evolution of Challenges and Demands
30
221 Developing Digital Libraries
31
222 EnterpriseEnhanced Learning
33
223 Developing Operational Enterprise Architectures
34
23 Collaborative Business Networking
40
231 Business Models
41
232 Reference Models
43
24 Interoperable Enterprise Collaboration
47
Emergence and Evolution
48
243 Knowledge Communication and Learning
49
Integration and Customization
50
245 Enterprise Interoperability
51
247 Embedded Systems Engineering
52
25 Innovation and Holistic Design
55
251 Industrial Customer Delivery
56
252 Industrial Innovation
57
253 Serviceteam Organization
59
26 Knowledge and Data Representation
60
27 Personal Workplaces and Interaction
61
271 Innovation and Knowledge Repositories
62
28 Summary
63
Industrial Evolutions
65
32 Experiences from EXTERNAL
67
322 The Knowledge Representation Layer
69
323 The Work Performance and Management Layer
70
The EXTERNAL Project
72
The Business Consulting Project Cycle
78
IT Consulting in an SME Network
80
327 Final Evaluation Results
82
331 Telecom Pilot
83
332 Conclusions
89
34 Summary
90
State of the Art of Enterprise Modeling
91
42 International EM Markets
93
422 The Business Process Management Market
94
431 Enterprise Engineering and Reengineering Activities
95
432 Product Life Cycle Management
99
433 Choice and Implementation of IT Systems and Solution
100
434 General Enterprise Architecture and Operations Support
101
441 The Zachman Framework for Enterprise Architecture
102
442 GERAM
104
443 GRAI Framework
109
444 ARIS Architecture of Integrated Information Systems
112
445 CIMOSA
115
446 The DoDAF Architecture Methodology
117
447 TOGAF Architecture Methodology
118
448 The TEAF Methodology from US Department of Commerce
119
Framework for Application Integration
120
4410 MISSION
122
45 Conclusions on Enterprise Architecture Frameworks
125
Enterprise Knowledge Architecture EKA
128
52 Principles for Active Knowledge Modeling AKM
131
53 EKA Enterprise Knowledge Architecture
133
531 Aspects and Multiple Dimensions
135
532 Reflection and Metamodeling
136
535 Simplicity
137
537 Complex Relationships Roles and Boundary Management
138
538 Identification Schemes and Resolution
139
539 Model Management
140
Interactive Behavior
141
542 Basic Modeling Services
142
543 Task Definition and Execution
144
544 The Execution Context of a Task
147
55 Summary
150
Approaches to Enterprise Solutions
153
61 ProductOriented Business Interoperability Profiles
154
611 Product Document Exchange and Management
155
613 Product Data Exchange Based on Reference Models and Semantic Mediation
156
614 Shared Product Information Repository
157
615 Federated Product Knowledge Repository
158
62 State of the Art and Requirements for Enterprise Solutions
159
622 Life Cycle Knowledge Integration
160
623 State of the Art in Product Design
161
63 ProductBased Interoperability Approaches
164
631 XML
166
632 Web Services
167
633 BPMI
168
635 OAGIS GIS
171
636 OASIS BPEL
172
638 RosettaNet
173
639 OMG
175
Open Distributed Processing Reference Model Enterprise Language
177
6311 W3C
178
6312 Base Ontology Technologies
180
OWLS and WSMO
186
6314 WEB 20
189
64 Summary
190
Introducing Active Knowledge Modeling in Industry
193
72 The Customer Delivery Process
194
721 Description of Methodology Steps
195
73 Each C3S3P Step
196
731 Concept Testing
197
732 Scaffolding
198
733 Scenarios Modeling
200
734 Solutions Modeling
203
763 The IRTV Methodology
223
77 Summary
225
Families of Platforms and Architectures
227
81 The MAPPER Architecture
229
82 Component Descriptions
231
822 Workflow Engine TRMS Client
235
823 CURE
238
824 Concert Chat
241
83 Task Patterns
243
831 Modeling Task Patterns
244
84 Task Management
250
842 Task User Interfaces
251
843 Allocating Persons to Roles
253
844 Task Execution Rules
256
85 Summary
257
Enterprise Design and Development
258
91 The CPPD Project Context
261
912 Nature of WorkGenerative Knowledge
262
913 The Active Knowledge Architecture
263
92 Addressing Industrial Demands
265
922 Customer and CPPD Requirements
266
923 Support for Early Design
267
924 CPPD Roles and Responsibilities
268
93 The AKM Approach to Product Design
269
931 CPPD Development
270
932 The Voice of the Customers
272
934 The Voice of Technology
273
935 Component Development
275
94 The CPPD Components
276
941 Configurable Product Components CPC
279
942 Configurable Visual Workplaces CVW
280
943 Configurable Work Processes CWP
281
944 Configurable Properties and Parameter Sets CPP
282
945 Configurable Product Structure CPS
284
946 Configurable Function Deployment CFD
285
948 Configurable Idea Bank CIB
286
951 Current Workplaces
288
96 Summary
299
Realizing the Knowledge Economy
301
101 Background
302
102 Networked Business Theories
304
1021 Value Chain Analysis
305
1022 Schumpeterian Innovation
307
1023 Network Economics
308
1024 Transaction Cost Economics
313
103 Realization Approaches
314
104 EU Research
316
1041 Business Requirements
317
105 AKM Contributions
318
1051 Industrial Communities
319
1052 From Paper to Models and Knowledge Architectures
320
1054 One Integrated Product Model
321
1055 Collaborative Holistic Design
322
1056 Data and Knowledge Management
323
1057 Project Design
324
1058 Changes in Management
325
107 Impacts and Consequences
327
1071 Industrial Communities
328
1073 Industrial Research
329
1076 Future Directions
330
108 Outlook
331
Toward Enterprise Visual Scenes
333
1111 The Powers of Visual Scenes
334
112 ThreeDimensional Model Applications in Industry
335
1121 Early Virtual Reality Experiments
336
1123 NASA Concurrent Design
342
1124 Maritime Applications
343
113 Nonindustrial Applications
344
114 Real Virtuality and Augmented Reality
348
1141 Metal and Plastic Printing
350
115 New Modeling and Visualization Techniques
353
1152 Annotated Maps
354
116 Future Solutions
356
An Example Environment
357
117 Summary
358
Scientific Foundations of AKM Technology
359
122 Human Learning Pedagogy and Psychology
363
123 Natural Language Linguistics and Semiotics
371
124 Process Design and Engineering
376
1241 Transformational PMLs
377
1243 Declarative and ConstraintBased Process Modeling
378
1245 System Dynamics
379
1246 ObjectOriented Process Modeling
380
126 Product Design and Engineering
383
127 Systems Engineering
384
128 Summary
386
Enterprise Knowledge Spaces
387
132 Modeling of Enterprise Knowledge Spaces
388
1322 Innovation Space
390
1323 Business Networking Space
391
1325 Overview
392
1326 Knowledge Architectures
393
1327 Reflection Across Knowledge Spaces
395
133 Summary
397
Summary and Directions
399
141 Core Principles and Solutions
400
142 Addressing the Main Challenges
405
143 Industrial Exploitation
407
144 The Way Ahead
409
References
411
Terminology and Abbreviations
424
Index
433
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About the author (2008)

Frank Lillehagen is President and CEO of Active Knowledge Modeling AS, the third company he has co-founded. From 1974 to 1985, he pioneered computer graphics and CAD in many Scandinavian industry sectors, and co-founded Eurographics in 1980. Overall, Frank developed four commercial CAD systems and the Metis modeling tools (now owned by Troux Technologies) and received many awards for his contributions to industrial innovation.

John Krogstie is Professor in Information Systems at IDI, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway, and also a senior advisor at SINTEF. Prior to that, he was employed as a manager with Accenture. John is the Norwegian Representative for IFIP TC8 and vice-chair of IFIP WG 8.1 on information systems design and evaluation.