Acts of Arguing: A Rhetorical Model of Argument

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SUNY Press, Nov 4, 1999 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 245 pages
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The revival of argumentation theory in the past few decades has focused on its logical and dialectical dimensions, with less attention paid to rhetorical features. This book explores and then redresses this imbalance. Tindale examines important logical and dialectical innovations in recent argumentation theory and shows that they depend implicitly upon rhetorical features of argument that have been suppressed in the account. This is illustrated using two extended case studies, one looking at Shell International's defense of its actions in Nigeria after the death of Ken Saro-Wiwa, and the other exploring the uses of character-based argument and testimony in a Holocaust-denial text and legal trial.
In addition to the case studies, two chapters treat serious problems that plague current argumentation theory. The first concerns the nature of fallacy; the second concerns the ties between traditional argumentation and a model of rationality that has been seriously critiqued by feminist and postmodernist scholars. In both instances, the discussion indicates how a rhetorical approach to argumentation offers fresh insights and suggests responses to the questions raised.
 

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Contents

The Case for Rhetorical Argumentation
1
2 Product Procedure and Process
3
3 Habermass Challenge
4
4 The Case for the Rhetorical
6
5 Origins in the Rhetoric
7
Enthymeme
8
7 Rhetorical Argumentation
12
8 Contemporary Views
14
45 The Universal Audience Again
117
46 Preliminary Examples
120
Case Studies in Rhetorical Argumentation
125
Al Background and Locale
126
A2 Arguer and Audiences
127
A3 Mode of Expression
128
A4 Dialectical Obligations
136
A5 The Logical Structure
139

9 Outline of the Study
18
Argument as Product The Logical Perspective
21
12 The Toulmin Transition
24
13 Informal Logic
25
14 Problems of the Productoriented Perspective
28
15 Rhetoric and Logic
37
Argumentation as Dialectical
43
21 Outline of the PragmaDialectical Approach
44
22 Misunderstandings and Qualifications
47
23 Pragmadialectics and Fallacies
48
24 Waltons Functional Account
50
25 A Critical Evaluation
54
Audiences Readers and Third Parties
63
Contexts and Arguments An Introduction to the Rhetorical Perspective
69
31 The New Rhetoric
70
32 Emotion and Argumentation
72
33 Context
75
34 Audiences
84
35 The Universal Audience
87
Audiences and the Conditions for Adherence
95
42 Relevance and Cognitive Environments
101
43 Acceptability
112
44 Blair and Johnsons Community of Model Interlocutors
115
A6 The Reasonableness of the Argumentation
141
Bl The Initial Text
145
B2 Harwoods Use ofEthotic Argument
146
B3 Testimony in the Zundel Trial
152
B5 The Role of Ethotic Argument
154
Fallacy
157
62 Senses of Fallacy
160
63 Fallacy as Bad Product
163
64 Fallacy as Bad Procedure
165
65 Fallacy as Bad Process
167
66 Crosswhites Perelmanian Account
174
67 The Act of Fallacy
178
Argumentation and the Critiques of Reason
183
72 Argument Persuasion and Critique
187
73 Femininity Emotion and the Body
191
74 Nyes Logics
195
75 Postcritique Faces of Argument
199
76 Differences Gestures and the Good
201
Conclusion Summation and Prolepsis
203
Notes
209
References
221
Index
239
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About the author (1999)

Christopher W. Tindale is Professor of Philosophy at Trent University. He is the coauthor of Good Reasoning Matters: A Constructive Approach to Critical Thinking and is coeditor of Argumentation and Rhetoric.

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