Adam and Eve in Seventeenth-Century Thought

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 27, 2008 - Religion - 252 pages
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This book offers a fascinating account of the central myth of Western culture - the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. Philip Almond examines the way in which the gaps, hints and illusions within this biblical story were filled out in seventeenth-century English thought. At this time, the Bible formed a fundamental basis for studies in all subjects, and influenced greatly the way that people understood the world. Drawing extensively on primary sources he covers subjects as diverse as theology, history, philosophy, botany, language, anthropology, geology, vegetarianism, and women. He demonstrates the way in which the story of Adam and Eve was the fulcrum around which moved lively discussions on topics such as the place and nature of Paradise, the date of creation, the nature of Adamic language, the origins of the American Indians, agrarian communism, and the necessity and meaning of love, labour and marriage.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 The origin of man
4
2 The perfection of man
33
3 The quest for Paradise
65
4 Animalia
110
5 Adams rib
143
6 The Fall
173
Epilogue
210
Bibliography
215
Index
231
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