Adaptive Agents, Intelligence, and Emergent Human Organization: Capturing Complexity Through Agent-Based Modeling

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National Academies Press, Jan 1, 2002 - Political Science - 136 pages
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Contents

Capturing complexity through agentbased modeling
7187
Agentbased modeling for understanding social intelligence
7189
Economic agents and markets as emergent phenomena
7191
Exploring cooperation and competition using agentbased modeling
7193
Agentbased modeling as organizational and public policy simulators
7195
Platforms and methods for agentbased modeling
7197
A revolution?
7199
Shortmemory traders and their impact on group learning in financial markets
7201
An agentbased computational approach
7243
A multitrajectory competition model of emergent complexity in human social organization
7251
A new frontier
7257
Tools and techniques for developing policies for complex and uncertain systems
7263
Policy analysis from first principles
7267
Population growth and collapse in a multiagent model of the Kayenta Anasazi in Long House Valley
7275
Methods and techniques for simulating human systems
7280
Institutional legitimacy from philosophy complexity science postmodernism and agentbased modeling
7288

Software agents and the route to the information economy
7207
Trust cooperation and market formation in the US and Japan
7214
Modeling the stylized facts in finance through simple nonlinear adaptive systems
7221
Learning dynamics in social dilemmas
7229
Altruism and reciprocity
7237
Endogenizing geopolitical boundaries with agentbased modeling
7296
Overcoming design and development challenges in agentbased modeling using ASCAPE
7304
A new decision sciences for complex systems
7309
Invariance and universality in social agentbased simulations
7314
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About the author (2002)

Founders Professor at the University of Texas, Brian Berry received his doctoral degree from the University of Washington in 1958. In the 1960s he helped lead the quantitative revolution in geography. As a faculty member at the University of Chicago, he served as dissertation supervisor to numerous students who later became productive research faculty and leaders in the discipline throughout the United States and Canada. Berry's pioneering work in urban geography added methodological rigor and empirical dimensions to the analysis of established concepts. He was particularly influential in developing "factorial ecology" as a means of understanding the social geography of cities. His work in retail geography is well known, particularly through The Geography of Market Centers and Retail Distribution (1967). He helped document and analyze the population turnaround specifically in the sunbelt and nonmetropolitan growth in the 1970s. Berry helped define research directions in urban systems analysis and in the geography of development.

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