Addictive Thinking: Understanding Self-Deception

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Hazelden Publishing, Jun 3, 2009 - Self-Help - 156 pages
2 Reviews
Abnormal thinking in addiction was originally recognized by members of Alcoholics Anonymous, who coined the term "stinking thinking." Addictive thinking often appears rational superficially, hence addicts as well as their family members are easily seduced by the attendant--and erroneous--reasoning process it can foster.

In Addictive Thinking, author Abraham Twerski reveals how self-deceptive thought can undermine self-esteem and threaten the sobriety of a recovering individual. This timely revision of the original classic includes updated information and research on depression and affective disorders, the relationship between addictive thinking and relapse, and the origins of addictive thought. Ultimately, Addictive Thinking offers hope to those seeking a healthy and rewarding life recovery.
 

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It's a great book on the tendencies of people who compulsively consume substances or what have you, any compulsion. The book outlines a lot of commonalities in the addicted mind however it doesn't offer much in the way of advice. In that way it's more like psychoanalysis. A suffering patient can read this, family member... or even any clinician could benefit from this knowledge and draw some of their own conclusions from it. 

Review: Addictive Thinking: Understanding the Addictive Process and Compulsive Behavior

User Review  - Olivia - Goodreads

Simple read that is a must have for every clinician and people working or living with addicts! Read full review

Contents

What Is Addictive Thinking?
3
SelfDeception and Addictive Thinking
13
The Addictive Thinkers Concept of Time
27
Confusing Cause and Effect
33
Origins of Addictive Thinking
37
Denial Rationalization and Projection
41
Dealing with Conflict
51
Hypersensitivity
57
The Confining Wall
87
Managing Feelings
91
Flavors and Colors of Reality
95
Must One Reach Bottom?
101
Addictive Thinkers and Trust
107
Spirituality and Spiritual Emptiness
113
Addictive Thinking and Relapse
117
The Frustrations of Growth
121

Morbid Expectations
61
Manipulating Others
63
Guilt and Shame
67
Omnipotence and Impotence
71
Admitting Errors
75
Anger
79
Ridiculous Explanations Sensible Solutions
125
Select Bibliography
129
Index
131
About the Author
137
Copyright

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Page 8 - A codependent person is one who has let another person's behavior affect him or her, and who is obsessed with controlling that person's behavior.
Page 14 - Not by the current definition of psychotic, which is a general term for any major mental disorder characterized by derangement of personality and loss of contact with reality.

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About the author (2009)

Dr. Abraham J. Twerski is founder and medical director emeritus of the Gateway Rehabilitation Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. A rabbi, psychiatrist, and chemical dependency counselor, he is the author of numerous journal articles and books, including Self-Discovery in Recovery, I Didn't Ask to Be in This Family: Sibling Relationships and How They Shape Adult Behavior and Dependencies, and, with "Peanuts" cartoonist Charles Schulz, When Do the Good Things Start?

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