Address Before the American Medical Association: At the Anniversary Meeting in Cincinnati, May 8, 1850

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John Wilson, 21, School Street, 1850 - Surgery - 65 pages
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Page 13 - ... pursuing an immoral course for selfish purposes, and quail before those who are better informed and imbued with a sound morality; and however triumphant they may appear to be for a short time, they must, and do, ultimately sink into the contempt their misconduct necessarily involves. A mere moral sentiment is not a sufficient support to the character of a professor of the healing art He is daily placed in situations, and involved in responsibilities, which can be known to no human mind but his...
Page 28 - DUBOIS was afterwards Baron of the Empire, member of the Legion of Honor, and a great friend of the Emperor Napoleon. The emperor employed him to officiate on the occasion of the birth of his son. When a difficulty occurred in the accouchement of the empress, DUBOIS represented to Napoleon that she would not be relieved without the application of considerable force. Napoleon immediately replied, " Treat her in the same manner you would a bourgeoise.
Page 14 - Notices. 553 danger, in a manner satisfactory to our own consciousness. . . . And finally, the confidence of every patient, whether religious or not, will be greatest in a physician who is animated by the noblest principles which the human mind is capable of entertaining.' Such views, unfolded by a man whose life and labors have so signally illustrated their truth, and the final reward to which they contribute, deserve to be stamped in the heart of every student. Amid the demoralizing influences...
Page 13 - ... feeling. . . . Physicians, when they come into practice, will find that one of the strongest barriers between them and irregular, uneducated pretenders, is to be found, not in prohibitory laws, but in the superior elevation of the moral sentiments. Men who pretend to exercise so responsible and exacting a profession without a foundation of real knowledge...
Page 14 - ... sink beneath his feet. Religious opinions and religious feelings form a highly important part of the medical character. They carry us through scenes of difficulty and danger, in a manner satisfactory to our own consciousness. They enable us to give support and consolation to patients who are suffering...
Page 48 - NEDAD, make the principal figure in this fatal list, and generally determine the third, day in death. If the patient survives till the fifth day, he very often recovers, by drinking water only, and throwing a quantity of cold water upon him, even in his bed, where he is permitted to lie, without attempting to make him dry, or to change his bed, till another deluge adds to the first.
Page 28 - The knife he employed was of the size and form of an oyster-knife, cutting on both edges, lie performed the operation for extraction of the cataract also with wonderful adroitness. But I remember a case in which the extraction of the lens was immediately followed by the ejection of the whole contents of the globe of the eye; on which DUBOIS very coolly said to the patient: 'Mon ami, vous area perdu votre ceil.
Page 54 - We have, indeed, known inconvenience to arise from the agitation of a patient when partially etherized. But, when perfectly affected by this narcotic agent, there is a delightful state of repose which protects him from the agonies of the knife, and allows the operator to pass tranquilly through the most delicate dissections.
Page 28 - ... that she would not be relieved without the application of considerable force. Napoleon immediately replied, " Treat her in the same manner you would a bourgeoise." DUBOIS was an admirable operator ; and I found it a great advantage to pass my time, while in Paris, in his family, and in the hospital in which he officiated. His operations for the stone were performed with a rapidity so great that one could scarcely follow him in the successive steps. The knife he employed was of the size and form...
Page 17 - was all we could obtain for our whole course of anatomy.' Even in London, at the period when WILLIAM HUNTER delivered the first private course on anatomy, in 1750, 552 Literary Notices. [December, a single subject was employed for the lectures in the London Hospital, and the course of the arteries was demonstrated by a foetal preparation. But it was Doctor...

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