Address Delivered in Commons Hall, at Raleigh, on the Occasion of Laying the Corner Stone: Of the North Carolina Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb, April 14th, 1848

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Egbert, Hovey & King, printers, 1848 - Deaf - 47 pages
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Page 41 - Register" of March 22d, 1844, containing the correspondence of Governor Morehead and Mr. "W. D. Cooke, on the subject of the establishment of an Institution for the Deaf and Dumb in North Carolina. The Twenty-Ninth Annual Report of the New-York Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb. A Plate with the following inscription : "On this 14th day of April, 1848, was laid this foundation Stone of a Building, to be appropriated to the Education of the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind, by the Grand...
Page 17 - ... and that Augustine, one of the fathers of the church, applied literally to their case' the words of the Apostle, " faith cometh by hearing"3 — we only recognise another example, to show how frequently the 1 Exodus iv. 11. * Aristotle. Observations on the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, p. 5 , Reprinted from North American Review 1834. Lucretius, the poet, expressed it in two lines which have been thus translated : — " To instruct the deaf no art could reach ; " No care improve them and no...
Page 8 - ... station, and to enjoy the social and religious privileges of their race — a work that can seldom be done in less than six or seven years, — at least one-fifth of the whole number ought to be constantly under instruction. That is, at this time, independent of the future increase, at least two thousand. Our eleven institutions actually contain but little more than nine hundred pupils, leaving eleven hundred unprovided for. This deficiency is chiefly in the Southern and extreme 1 Mr. Tibbatt's...
Page 19 - Yet the few glimpses into those benighted times, which we can now obtain, reveal, here and there, an isolated deaf mute whose lot had been meliorated by instruction. As early as the seventh century, as we are told by the venerable Bede, John, Bishop of Hagulstad, in the kingdom of Northumberland,2 calling to him a deaf-mute youth on whom he was accustomed to bestow charity, and making the sign of the cross on his tongue, commanded him to repeat the Saxon word, gea, yea, which he did, and afterwards...
Page 39 - The main building in the dimensions of its plan, is sixty feet by thirty-six. It has two wings, each thirty-eight feet by twentytwo, extending at right angles from the main edifice, and projecting from each extremity of it by nearly the whole width of each wing. In elevation it embraces four stories, including the basement, and the wings three, and is surmounted by a square tower or observatory, commanding an extensive and beautiful prospectIn the basement are the dining-room and store-rooms, and...
Page 40 - The corresponding apartments in the western extremity, afford accommodations for the Principal and his family, the matron, &c. The chief merit of the arrangement consists in its preserving the two departments, as far as relates to the accommodations, amusements, and pursuits of the pupils out of the...
Page 32 - ... and capable of fulfilling well all domestic and social duties. The degree of success attained in the instruction of the deaf and dumb must not, therefore, in all cases, be estimated by their ability to use language as a medium of inter-communication with the speaking world. The Eighth Class was one of the same standing as the preceding, but of a somewhat higher intellectual grade. It...
Page 1 - THE LITERARY FUND, RALEIGH, April 15, 1848. AT a meeting of the President and Directors of the Literary Fund, held this day, on motion, it was Resolved unanimously, that the thanks of this Board are due, and ate hereby tendered to 1 1 AUVF.Y P.
Page 41 - Joyner, and the corner-stone waa laid according to the forms of the Masonic Fraternity, under the direction of WF Collins, assisted by other officers of the Order. In the leaden box in the hollow of the stone were deposited the following articles : A copy of the Holy Bible. Constitution of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina. A copy of the Proceedings for 1847. An impression of its Seal in metal. Officers of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina. Names of the Officers of State. Newspapers of the City....
Page 10 - ... and happiness. You had in your own State, according to the census of 1840, three hundred and fifty-four deaf mutes ; two hundred and eighty of whom were of European descent. Adding onethird for the inaccuracies of the census, and for the increase since 1840, we have three hundred and seventy- three white deaf and dumb persons.

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