Address of Mr. S. Teackle Wallis: Chairman of the Committee, with the Reply of His Excellency, Governor Whyte, Delivered in the Senate Chamber, at Annapolis, at the Unveiling of the Statue of Chief Justice Taney, December 10th, 1872

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J. Murphy & Company, 1872 - Judges - 18 pages

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Page 13 - Another task, indeed, it is to embody in a single image the expression of a great historic life, so that standing, severe and apart, it shall be its own interpreter forever to the generations of men. ' The pathway of a great judge does not lead through the realms of fancy. Neither in reality nor in retrospect is there much of the flush of imagination upon it or about it. With such a career art cannot deal, nor history, as with those brilliant lives which dazzle while they last, and are seen only...
Page 12 - The figure has been treated by the artist in the spirit of that noble and absolute simplicity which is the type of the highest order of greatness, and is, therefore, its grandest, though its most difficult expression, in art. The sculptor deals easily enough with subjects which admit of ornament and illustration, or address the passions or the fancy. The graces he can lend his work — the smiles with which it wins us — the beautiful or joyous images or thoughts with which he can surround it —...
Page 9 - ... laid the deep and broad foundations of his professional learning and success. In the chamber where we meet to day to do him honor — and to whose historical associations this scene will add another, not the least — he sat for years a Senator of Maryland, the peer of the distinguished men who sat around him, when no legislative body in the Union surpassed that Senate in dignity, ability, or moral elevation. In the Chamber there, above us, where the honorable Judges, who join us in this tribute...
Page 16 - His constitutional opinions were already part of the recorded jurisprudence of the country, and he could not change them because the tempest was howling. It was the conviction of his life that the Government under which we lived was of limited powers, and that its Constitution had been framed for war as well as peace. Though he died, therefore, he could not surrender that conviction at the call of the trumpet. He had plighted his troth to the Liberty of the Citizen and the Supremacy of the Laws,...
Page 7 - House itself," and Messrs. G. Frederick Maddox, of St. Mary's county, Chas. E. Trail and Hugh McAleer, of Frederick county, James T. Earle, of Queen Anne's county, Henry Williams, of Calvert county, and George M. Gill and ST Wallis, of Baltimore city, were appointed a committee to carry into effect the provisions of the statute. Upon the organization of the committee, it was found to be their unanimous desire that the execution of the proposed work should be entrusted to the distinguished sculptor,...
Page 18 - Already the waters of the torrent have nearly spent their force, and high above them, as they fall, unstained by their pollution and unshaken by their rage, stands where it stood, in grand and reverend simplicity, the august figure of the great Chief Justice...
Page 18 - ... and his image was withheld from its place in the chamber which was filled already with his fame. ' Against all this the State of Maryland here registers her protest in the living bronze. She records it in no spirit of resentment, or even of contention, but silently and proudly — as her illustrious son, without a word, committed his reputation to the justice of his countrymen. Nor doubts she of the answer that posterity will make to her appeal. Already the grateful manhood of the people has...
Page 12 - As a few moments will disclose to us, the artist has chosen to present us his illustrious subject in his robes of office, as we saw him when he sat in judgment. The stature is heroic, but, with that exception, the traits of nature are not altered or disguised. The weight of years that bent the venerable form has not been lightened, and the lines of care, and suffering, and thought, are as life traced them. But, unless the master's hand has...

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