Address of Sir Frederick Pollock: And Other Addresses, Delivered on the Occasion of the Dedicatory Services of the Cincinnati Law School Building, October 17, 1903 ...

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1904 - 23 pages
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Page 13 - In all the civil difficulties of life, men depend upon your exercised faculties, and your spotless integrity ; and they require of you an elevation above all that is mean, and a spirit which will never yield when it ought not to yield. As long as your profession retains its character for learning the rights of mankind will be well arranged ; as long as it retains its character for virtuous boldness, those rights will be well defended...
Page 15 - Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain, — These constitute a State ; And sovereign law, that State's collected will, • O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill.
Page 16 - Reason is the soul of the law, and when the reason of any particular law ceases, so does the law itself.
Page 3 - The president, trustees, and faculty of The Cincinnati College;' and by that name and style, they and their successors shall be a body in law, capable of contracting and being...
Page 13 - I have to say in conclusion is, that the more I watch the legal profession and observe it, the more I am convinced that with the great responsibility, with the great trusts confided to it, with the great issues committed to its keeping, with the great power it has to direct public feeling and public sentiment, with the great responsibilities resulting, take it as a mass— and...
Page 16 - Congress ; but let the profession still have a right to "boast that it has, as of old, a class whose ambition is above mere outside show and the honors which fawning and flattery can win ; and who, standing in the foremost rank of culture and civilization, are able to guide the public mind in the great political inquiries of the day, to help solve the moral problems upon which the progress of the race depends, and at the same time to act as the safe counsellors and fearless advocates in upholding...
Page 15 - Law, properly understood, is no other than right reason, agreeing with nature, spread abroad among all men, ever consistent with itself, eternal, whose office is to summon to duty by its commands, to deter from vice by its prohibitions, — which, however, to the good never commands or forbids in vain, never influences the wicked either by commanding or forbidding. In contradiction to this Law, nothing can be laid down, nor does it admit of partial or entire repeal. Nor can we be released from this...
Page 23 - I desire to present — it is upon the entrusting to the judicial department of the whole subject of the constitutional law, for all purposes, that our government rests. 'While that stands and is maintained in its purity, this Constitution will stand. The ship will ride as long as the anchor holds, though storm after storm may sweep across the face of the sea. While that remains, the system will remain. Details may be modified...
Page 20 - ... proceedings were of a summary character, intended to result in a conviction, and not merely a committal for trial. The Justices were therefore acting judicially. Of such a proceeding before Justices it was said in 1829 in Daubney v. Cooper, the Court of King's Bench, (reported in 10 B. & C. 237, 240) 'one of the essential qualities of a Court of Justice is that its proceedings should be in public, and that all parties who may be desirous...
Page 8 - Cox, a man of scholarly antecedents, enriched by experience in the military service in the civil war, where he attained the rank of Major General of Volunteers.

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