Addresses at the Complimentary Dinner to Dr. Benjamin Apthorp Gould. Hotel Vend˘me, Boston, May 6, 1885

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T.P. Nichols, 1885 - 40 pages
 

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Page 19 - Austria, who labored with us for more than ten years, is now at the head of the Argentine Naval Academy in Buenos Aires, with more than three hundred pupils and an elegant little observatory, where he finds repose from administrative cares, in astronomical work analogous to that to which he gave his energies at Cordoba.
Page 34 - ... observatories since about 1750. Within the same limits there are about 95,000 stars as bright or brighter than the ninth magnitude, which are usually observed in narrow belts or zones, and such stars are usually referred to as zone stars. The bright stars are common to nearly all general catalogues, but the positions of the fainter stars depend for the most part on two or three separate observations. Dr. Gould has formed two catalogues since 1872 — a general catalogue of stars extending to...
Page 15 - The original purpose of the expedition was to make a thorough survey of the southern heavens by means of observations in zones between the parallel of 30░ and the polar circle ; but the plan grew under the influence of circumstances, until the scrutiny comprised the whole region from the tropic to within 10░ of the pole— somewhat more than 57░ in width, instead of 37░. Although it was no part of the original design to perform all the numerical computations, and still less to bring the results...
Page 34 - Gould's observa'ions, can you wonder that this work, which seems so far beyond the limit of human enduiance, is at once my amazement, my admiration, and— I must add — my despair ? The whole number of stars in the two Cordoba catalogues is nearly three times as great as in any single catalogue thus far constructed ; and it must be remembered in this connection, that the great catalogues of Lalande, of Bessel, of Argelander, and of Schjellerup, represent the labours of a life-time. The total number...
Page 17 - Congress acceded to my recom16 mendation that a modest sum should be annually appropriated for the purchase of barometers, thermometers, .rain-gauges, etc., to be lent to volunteer observers, and for arranging, computing and publishing the results. In this way was organized, in 1872, the Argentine Meteorological Office, which has established no less than fifty-two stations, scattered from the Andes to the Atlantic, and from Bolivia to Tierra del Fuego. At the end of the year 1884 there were already...
Page 18 - There are but two points more that I wish to mention. One is, that I cherish a hope that our sojourn at Cordoba may hereafter be considered as marking an epoch in a new method of astronomical observation, namely, the photographic. The inception and introduction of this method belongs to our countryman, Mr. Rutherfurd; and it was only through his friendly aid in several ways that I was enabled to give it a larger scope, in spite of many obstacles. Now, I can report that every important cluster of...
Page 38 - Your polite Invitation to attend the "Anniversary Meeting of the Old Settlers" came duly to hand, and it was my intention to be present and assist in the celebration, but I regret to say that it will not be possible for me to do so.
Page 17 - ... lines, with tolerable precision, for all of South America from the torrid zone to Cape Horn. Some little has also been accomplished in determining local constants of terrestrial magnetism ; and our determinations of geographical position have nearly kept pace with the extension of the telegraph wires.
Page 25 - that lofty and melancholy Psalm," says Lord Macaulay, "in which the fragility of human life is contrasted with the immutability of Him to whom a thousand years are but as yesterday when it is passed, or as a watch in the night." The great storm of war which rolled over the country had removed Hampden from his old house, and all the scenes of his early felicity. He never resided in Buckinghamshire after his second marriage ; his Parliamentary duties compelled a residence in London, and he chose what...
Page 11 - ... should find it difficult to control his emotions or to give full utterance to his thanks. If the pursuance of my appointed task has entailed sacrifices, the chief among them has certainly been the long separation from the friends at home, whose companionship, encouragement and sympathy were always my greatest source of happiness, outside the narrow limits of domestic life. But there has been something more than mere separation ; for, however cherished and abiding may be our memory in the hearts...

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