Addresses Delivered to the Students of the Royal Academy

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Longmans, Green & Company, 1897 - Art - 310 pages
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Page 302 - Huss, John, a zealous reformer from popery, who lived in Bohemia toward the close of the fourteenth, and the beginning of the fifteenth centuries. He was bold and persevering ; but at length, trusting to the deceitful Catholics, he was by them brought to trial, condemned as heretic, and burnt at the stake.
Page 56 - And the dignity of these sensations lies in this, that they are inseparably connected by association of ideas, with a range of perceptions and feelings of infinite variety and scope. They come fraught with dim complex memories of all the ever-shifting spectacle of inanimate Creation, and of the more deeply stirring phenomena of life; of the storm and the lull, the splendour and the darkness of the outer world; of the storm and the lull, the splendour and the darkness of the changeful and transitory...
Page 57 - The most sensitively religious mind may indeed rest satisfied in the consciousness that it is not on the wings of abstract thought alone that we rise to the highest moods of contemplation, or to the most chastened moral temper; and assuredly Arts which have for their chief task to reveal the inmost springs of Beauty in the created world, to display all the pomp of the teeming earth and all the pageant of those heavens of which we are told that they declare the Glory of God, are not the least eloquent...
Page 62 - Whatever of dignity, whatever of strength we have within us will dignify and will make strong the labours of our hands; whatever littleness degrades our spirit will lessen them and drag them down. Whatever noble fire is in our hearts will burn also in our work; whatever purity is ours will chasten and exalt it; for as we are, so our work is, and what we sow in our lives, that, beyond a doubt, we shall reap for good or for ill in the strengthening or defacing of whatever gifts have fallen to our lot.
Page 18 - Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low, Each like a corpse within its grave, until Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow Her clarion o'er the dreaming earth...
Page 42 - I use the words in no rhetorical sense, but in their plain and sober meaning — than to deny that the moral complexion, the ethos of the artist, does in truth tinge every work of his hand, and fashion, in silence, but with the certainty of fate, the course and current of his whole career.
Page 20 - Art is based on the desire to express and the power to kindle in others emotions astir in the artist and latent in those to whom he addresses himself. (13-14) The artist's personality is, therefore, the conduit through which the world is related to its visual apprehension: Every emotion that reaches us through the channels of an artist's temperament comes to us coloured and determined by the idiosyncrasy of that temperament, and we get the man added to the thing. The impression produced on us is...
Page 14 - Art whatsoever . . . is the consciousness of emotion in the presence of the phenomena of Life and Nature. This conscious emotion, this momentary intensification of life it was which, seeking for a vent either through some direct form of personal utterance, ejaculation, or movement of the body, or through the endeavour to imitate the spirit which aroused it, called Art into existence; for Art is based on the desire to express and the power to kindle in others emotions astir in the artist and latent...
Page 89 - ... we find a new ideal of balanced form wholly Aryan, and of which the only parallel I know is sometimes found in the women of another Aryan race — your own.
Page 62 - Believe me, whatever of dignity, whatever of strength, we have within us, will display and make strong the labours of our hands; whatever littleness degrades our spirit will lessen them and drag them down; whatever noble fire is in our hearts will burn also in our work; whatever purity is ours will chasten and exalt it. For as we are, so our work is...

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