Adelphae

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Cambridge University Press, 1976 - Drama - 259 pages
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The Adelphoe (The Brothers) of Terence is a Latin adaptation of a comedy of the same name by the Greek comic playwright Menander. The theme of the play is the perennially interesting question of the relationship between the generations and the proper way to bring up a son. In the introduction Mr Martin considers Terence in the context of Roman comedy generally and discusses the background of the Adelphoe. There is also a section on metre and scansion and a short analysis of the textual tradition. The full and detailed commentary, besides elucidating the text, seeks at all times to help the reader to understand the work as a play to be enjoyed. The edition is intended for use by students at school and university and for anyone wishing to read and appreciate the play in the original.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
2 Terence and the Adelphoe
16
3 Metre and Scansion
30
4 The text
38
P TERENTI AFRI ADELPHOE
43
Commentary
96
I Menander and Diphilus in Act II of Terences Adelphoe
242
II Metrical analysis of Adelphoe 61017
246
Bibliography
248
Index to the Commentary
253
Addenda 2001
261
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

Terence was born in Carthage. As a boy, he was the slave of Terentius Lucanus, a Roman senator, who educated him and set him free. He was an intimate friend of the younger Scipio and of the elegant poet Laelius. They were the gilded youth of Rome, and Terence's plays were undoubtedly written for this inner circle, not for the vulgar crowd. They were adapted from Menander and other Greek writers of the New Comedy and, in the main, were written seriously on a high literary plane with careful handling of plot and character. The six comedies are all extant.

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