Administering the Colonizer: Manchuria’s Russians under Chinese Rule, 1918-29

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UBC Press, Jan 1, 2011 - Social Science - 304 pages
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In the 1920s, Westerners viewed Harbin, in North Manchuria, as a world turned upside down. Located in a former Chinese Eastern Railway concession with a significant Russian population, the city and the Special District in which it resided were represented as places that had reversed the "natural" racial hierarchy a place where white was the ruled and not the ruler.

Administering the Colonizer explores how a non-Western culture dealt with the Western minority under its administration. It reveals that contrary to observations and ideological and national histories emanating from Moscow and present-day Beijing, republican China created policies in a number of areas that not only promoted its own sovereignty but also protected the Russian minority.

A historical examination of how an ethnic, cultural, and racial majority coexisted with a minority of a different culture and race, his book also restores to history the multiple national influences that have shaped northern China and Chinese nationalism.
 

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Contents

Where Yellow Ruled White Harbin 1929
1
North Manchuria before 1917
16
From Russian Concession to Chinese Special District
38
Police Courts and Prisons
56
5 Experiments in CoAdministering the Chinese Eastern Railway
98
The Struggle over the Special Districts Land
120
7 Whose City Is This? Special District Municipal Governance
151
Secondary and PostSecondary Education
184
Playing Guest and Host on the Manchurian Stage
209
Appendix
226
Notes
229
Bibliography
269
Index
277
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About the author (2011)

Blaine R. Chiasson is an associate professor of modern Chinese history and Sino-Russian relations at Wilfrid Laurier University.

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