Admission to the United Nations: Charter Article 4 and the Rise of Universal Organization

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Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2009 - Political Science - 332 pages
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The United Nations began as an alliance during World War II. Eventually, however, the UN came to approximate a universal organization - i.e., open to and aspiring to include all States. This presents a legal question, for Article 4 of the Charter contains substantive criteria to limit admission of States to the UN and no formal amendment has touched that part of the Charter. This book gives an up-to-date account of admission to the UN, from the 1950s logjam through on-going controversies like Kosovo and Taiwan. With reference to Charter law, the book considers how Article 4 came to accommodate universality and what the future of a universal organization in a world of politically diverse States might be.
 

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Contents

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About the author (2009)

Thomas D. Grant, Ph.D. (2000) in Law, University of Cambridge, JD (1994), Yale Law School, is a Senior Research Fellow of Wolfson College, University of Cambridge. He has published extensively on public international law.

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