Adult Literacy in America

Front Cover
Irwin S. Kisch
DIANE Publishing, Jan 1, 1994 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 150 pages
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Offers an overview of the results of the National Adult Literacy Survey. Describes adult literacy at 5 levels in terms of the types of literacy skills needed to use various kinds of printed and written information in our society, including prose literacy, document literacy, and quantitative literacy. Received national attention!
 

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Contents

XIII
14
XIV
16
XV
22
XVI
25
XVII
28
XVIII
30
XIX
32
XX
34
XXXIII
60
XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
68
XLII
68

XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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LI
111
LII
147
LIV
150

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Page 2 - about adults' literacy skills. Through a consensus process, this panel drafted the following definition of literacy, which helped set the framework for the young adult survey: Using printed and written information to function in society, to achieve one's goals, and to develop one's knowledge and potential. 1
Page 3 - ability to read, write, and speak in English and compute and solve problems at levels of proficiency necessary to function on the job and in society, to achieve one's goals, and to develop one's knowledge and potential.
Page 108 - Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania Midwest: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas South: Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas
Page 11 - Some tasks in this level require the reader to search for information in dense text which contains a number of plausible distractors. Others ask readers to make high-level inferences or use specialized background knowledge. Some tasks ask readers to contrast complex information. Tasks in this level
Page 6 - oversampled to ensure reliable estimates of literacy proficiencies and to permit analyses of the performance of these subpopulations. To give states an opportunity to explore the skill levels of their populations, each of the 50 states was invited to participate in a concurrent assessment.
Page 108 - Newspaper Reading Respondents were asked how often they read a newspaper in English: every day, a few times a week, once a week, less than once a week, or never.
Page 108 - and West. The states in each region are identified below. Northeast: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania Midwest: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas South: Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma,...
Page 11 - Some tasks in this level require the reader to integrate multiple pieces of information from one or more documents. Others ask readers to cycle through rather complex tables or graphs which contain information that is irrelevant or inappropriate to the task. Tasks in this level, like those at the previous levels, ask
Page xix - in a recent report from the American Society for Training and Development, "The association between skills and opportunity for individual Americans is powerful and growing. . . . Individuals with poor skills do not have much to bargain with; they are condemned to low earnings and limited choices.
Page xiii - information on adults' literacy skills, trained staff interviewed nearly 13,600 individuals aged 16 and older during the first eight months of 1992. These participants had been randomly selected to represent the adult population in the country as a whole. In addition, about 1,000 adults were surveyed in each of 12 states that chose to participate in a special study designed to

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