Adult children and aging parents

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Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, Jul 1, 1989 - Social Science - 216 pages
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This book was developed to assist counselors and other caregivers in working with adult children and their aging parents. The first chapter addresses normative developmental issues in later life. This includes the demography of aging, theories of aging, and attitudes toward older persons, along with suggestions for identifying at-risk populations, implications for counselors, and criteria for choosing assessment instruments for older persons. The second chapter addresses several issues of aging, including depression, suicide, drug and alcohol abuse, and organic brain diseases, that are critical for counselors. The third chapter examines psychosocial concerns of caregivers and adult children as well as family relationships and patterns in later life: aging and loss, the retirement transition, and the transition to grandparenthood. The fourth chapter deals with the possible needs of both older persons and adult children in relation to four family stress situations: caregiving, institutionalization, elder abuse, and death and dying. The final chapter provides general information useful to counselors working with adult children and aging parents. The focus is on building and maintaining healthy, positive relationships. Several counseling methods are described,including bibliotherapy, life review, genograms, and early recollections. An annotated list of assessment instruments is appended, along with an extensive list of references. (TE)

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Contents

CRITICAL ISSUES
39
Suicide
51
Alcohol and Drug Abuse
57
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

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About the author (1989)

JANE E. MYERS, Professor of Counseling Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, is certified nationally as a gerontological, clinical, and rehabilitation counselor and has received three national awards for her research in gerontology.

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