Adult Development and Aging

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Prentice Hall, 2002 - Psychology - 624 pages
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This comprehensive book helps readers process a clear picture of adult development and aging with the help and results of intensive scientific research. It challenges common stereotypes about this subject matter, and interprets the research data into an optimistic yet realistic appraisal of the many problems faced by the elderly in today's society.Chapter topics look at independence and intimacy in young adulthood; responsibility and failure in the middle years; the reintegration or despair of later life; research methodology; families; careers; personality development; learning and memory; intellectual and biological development; mental disorders; and death and bereavement. For individuals who want to view the potential richness of life—at all stages, and/or understand the lives of older adults they may care for.

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER
10
CHAPTER 2
31
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About the author (2002)

K. Warner Schaie, PhD, is an Evan Pugh Professor of Human Development and Psychology and director of the Gerontology Center at Pennsylvania State University. He has previously held professional appointments at the University of Nebraska, West Virginia University, and the University of Southern California. Dr. Schaie received his BA from the University of California - Berkeley and his MS and PhD degrees from the University of Washington, all in psychology. He is the author or editor of 26 books and over 200 journal articles and chapters related to the study of human aging. Dr. Schaie is the recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award of the American Psychological Association and of the Robert W. Kleemeier Award for Distinguished Research Contributions from the Gerontological Society of America. He was awarded the honorary degree of Dr. phil. h.c. by the Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Germany.

Sherry L. Willis is Professor of Human Development at The Pennsylvania State University. She received her Ph.D. in Educadtional Psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests include: adult cognitive development with a focus on middle age, cognitive training in later adulthood, and everyday problem solving in adulthood. She is a co-director of the Seattle Longitudinal Study with K. Warner Schaie, and has co-authored the textbook Adult Development and Aging, Fifth Edition. She is co-editor of two other books on midlife: Life in the Middle (with J. Reid) and The Baby Boomers (with S. Whitbourne). She is a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, the American Psychological Society, and Divisions 15 and 20 of the American Psychological Association, and a past-president of APA Division 20, Adult Development and Aging (1993-1994). In 1992, she received the Pattishall Distinguished Research Award and in 1999 the Pennsylvania State University Faculty Scholar Medal for Outstanding Achievement.

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