Advance Australasia: A Day-to-day Record of a Recent Visit to Australasia

Front Cover
Hodder and Stoughton, 1907 - Australasia - 268 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ii - CACHALOT." IDYLLS OF THE SEA. THE LOG OF A SEA WAIF. THE MEN OF THE MERCHANT SERVICE.
Page 26 - Light, bitterly as he was reviled at the time for making such a selection of a site for the capital of the new Colony. But it is not until the visitor has been taken in hand by some hospitable citizen, and, seated in a motor-car, has been whirled away by winding roads through lovely scenery up the beautiful flanks of Mount Lofty, that he recognises what a wonderfully handsome and ideally situated city it is.
Page 151 - Bearing in mind the conditions of labour in the land of the free and home of the brave, I was curious to see what manner of men these were employed here.
Page 215 - I know that my ideas in the matter of food are considered to be old-fashioned and heterodox, but I cannot help that ; my deliberate opinion is that in the matter of food which is honest and good without being ambitiously messy and ostentatiously disguised, the Antipodes can challenge the world. As far as food is concerned, it is like travelling from one home to another. The extent and fertility of this great plain, bounded on one side by the sea and on the other, far inland, by snow-capped ranges...
Page 28 - ... had been crushed. There was an air of absolute purity, of precise cleanliness everywhere which was exceedingly pleasant to notice, but there was also a curious solemnity, a brooding over everything, that was most impressive. Even on the top floor, where the machinery was in evidence, it made only a subdued hum, all being driven by an English-made petrol engine which I was proudly informed had run for four or five years...
Page 28 - Again, anything more unlike the wine-cellars of the Old World that I have seen could not possibly be imagined. There, cobwebs, mildew, fungi, and a damp, earthy smell as of the tomb ; here, not a spot of dirt or speck of dust to be seen anywhere, as if scores of busy housemaids were all over the place every morning, which of course could not be the case. There were very few men about. Labour is costly here, and consequently every laboursaving appliance that can be devised is employed. But I was glad...
Page 27 - Adelaide hawkers can afford to stand all day selling grapes that are simply perfection for size, flavour, and variety at a uniform rate of a penny a pound. But gladly as I always welcome the view of an orchard or a vineyard, I confess that my attention was always more quickly arrested by the fat, black level land in the valleys, whereon was growing in most lavish profusion all the vegetables that we love at home — peas and beans, onions and potatoes, parsnip and beet, side by side with luxuriant...
Page 27 - ... and again invite you to survey the panorama beneath you, that is most pleasant to witness. They do not brag, bid you — as they would if they were Yankees — burst into unstinted panegyric, but they wait confidently and quietly for the expression of your honest opinion. And I do not think they are ever disappointed.
Page 25 - ... of need for hurry in the world." And anyhow, all the roads in the city are just perfect to ride on either in buggy or motor, on a bicycle or to walk on, so splendidly graded and beautifully kept is the asphalt of which they are composed. It is an object-lesson patent to the most casual eye of the character of the people, this wonderful care of the roads. Of all the cities that I have ever seen Adelaide comes easily first in the perfect beauty of its situation and arrangement. Level it is certainly,...
Page 26 - ... the capital of the new Colony. But it is not until the visitor has been taken in hand by some hospitable citizen, and, seated in a motor-car, has been whirled away by winding roads through lovely scenery up the beautiful flanks of Mount Lofty, that he recognises what a wonderfully handsome and ideally situated city it is. And there is a quiet exultation about those same citizens as, mounting higher and higher, they again and again invite you to survey the panorama beneath you, that is most pleasant...

Bibliographic information